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Who is this person?
12-12-2020, 06:36 AM
Post: #1771
RE: Who is this person?
Very good guesses, Michael and David, but incorrect. Michael's guess is another person who met the person who is the right answer.
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12-12-2020, 08:54 AM
Post: #1772
RE: Who is this person?
Harriett Beecher Stowe?

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Rob

Abraham Lincoln in the only man, dead or alive, with whom I could have spent five years without one hour of boredom.
--Ida M. Tarbell

I want the respect of intelligent men, but I will choose for myself the intelligent.
--Carl Sandburg
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12-12-2020, 09:04 AM
Post: #1773
RE: Who is this person?
Yes, Rob! Indeed this quote came from Harriet Beecher Stowe.

In 1864 Stowe's thoughts on Lincoln were published, and the quote I used came from that article. Stowe's thoughts were in a periodical entitled Littell's Living Age.
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12-13-2020, 01:13 PM (This post was last modified: 12-13-2020 01:14 PM by David Lockmiller.)
Post: #1774
RE: Who is this person?
Who wrote these words regarding President Abraham Lincoln?

"I never saw him angry but once, and I had no wish to see a second exhibition of his wrath."

"So very difficult a matter is it to trace and find out the truth of anything by history." -- Plutarch
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12-13-2020, 01:26 PM
Post: #1775
RE: Who is this person?
John Hay?
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12-13-2020, 01:32 PM
Post: #1776
RE: Who is this person?
Robert Lincoln? (Referring to the incident where Robert misplaced the valise containing the first inaugural address?)
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12-13-2020, 02:33 PM
Post: #1777
RE: Who is this person?
William Stoddard?

So when is this "Old Enough To Know Better" supposed to kick in?
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12-13-2020, 04:14 PM
Post: #1778
RE: Who is this person?
Ulysses S. Grant
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12-13-2020, 04:23 PM
Post: #1779
RE: Who is this person?
After much thought I am going to change my answer. This sounds like something Francis Carpenter might have said. So my new guess is Carpenter.
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12-13-2020, 09:48 PM
Post: #1780
RE: Who is this person?
All of these well-educated answers to the question have the characteristic in common that they are close, well-known associates of President Lincoln. The person in question was a relative unknown at the time he raised the ire of President Lincoln. I do not know if the following lengthy hint will be of much assistance in identifying the correct answer, but it provides useful information nonetheless.

This person and his commanding officer were considering making an important government policy change, on the advice of other prominent citizens, in the border state of Maryland, which the two officers commanded.

"The first intimation I received that this policy [change] was distasteful to the administration came from Secretary Stanton. I had told him what we thought, and what we hoped to accomplish. I noticed an amused expression on the face of the War Secretary, and when I ended he said dryly,"You and [the person's commanding officer] had better attend to your own business." I asked him what he meant by "our business." He said, "Obeying orders, that's all."

Not long after this talk with Mr. Stanton, [a certain general] came into Maryland to recruit for a negro brigade, then first authorized. I directed the general to recruit slaves only. He said he would be glad to do so, but wanted authority in writing from [the commanding officer]. I tried my general, and he refused, saying that such authority could come only from the War Department, as the [recruiting general] was acting directly under its instructions. I could not move him, and knowing that he had a leave of absence for a few days, to transact some business at Boston, I waited patiently until he was fairly off, and then issued the order to the [recruiting general]. The General took an idle government steamer, and left for the part of Maryland where slaves were most abundant. [The General]was scarcely out of sight before I awakened to the opposition I had excited. The Hon. Reverdy Johnson appeared at head-quarters, heading a delegation of solid citizens who wanted the Union and slavery saved, one and inseparable. I gave them scant comfort, and they left for Washington. That afternoon came a telegram from the War Department, asking who was in command at Baltimore. I responded that the [commanding general], being absent for a few days only, had left affairs in control of his chief of staff. Then came a curt summons, ordering me to appear at the War Department. I obeyed, arriving in the evening at the old, somber building. Being informed that the Secretary was at the Executive Mansion, I repaired there, sent in my card, and was at once shown into the presence, not of Mr. Stanton, but of the President. I do not care to recall the words of Mr. Lincoln. I wrote them out that night, for I was threatened a shameful dismissal from the service, and I intended appealing to the public. They were exceedingly severe, for the President was in a rage. I was not allowed a word in my own defense, and was only permitted to say that I would countermand my order as well as I could. I was saved cashiering through the interference of Stanton and Chase, and the further fact that a row over such a transaction at that time would have been extremely awkward.

My one act made Maryland a free State.

Word went out, and spread like wildfire, that "Mr. Linkum was a callin' on de slaves to fight foh freedum."

The poor creatures poured into Baltimore with their families, on foot, on horseback, in old wagons, and even on sleds stolen from their masters. The late masters became clamorous for compensation, and Mr. Lincoln ordered a commission to assess damages. Secretary Stanton put in a proviso that those cases only should be considered where the claimant could take the iron-bound oath of allegiance. Of course no slaves were paid for.

"So very difficult a matter is it to trace and find out the truth of anything by history." -- Plutarch
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12-14-2020, 04:43 AM
Post: #1781
RE: Who is this person?
David, since you don't seem to be saying that we cannot research this person via Google I went ahead and did so. My new answer is Donn Piatt.

http://www.mrlincolnswhitehouse.org/resi...1819-1891/
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12-14-2020, 05:10 PM (This post was last modified: 12-14-2020 05:20 PM by David Lockmiller.)
Post: #1782
RE: Who is this person?
(12-14-2020 04:43 AM)RJNorton Wrote:  David, since you don't seem to be saying that we cannot research this person via Google I went ahead and did so. My new answer is Donn Piatt.

http://www.mrlincolnswhitehouse.org/resi...1819-1891/

You are absolutely correct, Roger.

I followed your hyperlink and read as much as I could before I had to stop at this point:

"Piatt had tried to push the process along in Maryland (prematurely, in Lincoln’s view)."

Donn Piatt himself wrote in Reminiscences of Abraham Lincoln by Distinguished Men of His Time, Chapter XXVIII, page 496: "My one act made Maryland a free State."

The trivia question provides President Lincoln's opinion of this [premature] effort: "I never saw him angry but once, and I had no wish to see a second exhibition of his wrath." (Reminiscences, page 494.)

"I do not care to recall the words of Mr. Lincoln. I wrote them out that night, for I was threatened a shameful dismissal from the service, and I intended appealing to the public. They were exceedingly severe, for the President was in a rage. I was not allowed a word in my own defense, and was only permitted to say that I would countermand my order as well as I could. I was saved cashiering through the interference of Stanton and Chase, and the further fact that a row over such a transaction at that time would have been extremely awkward." (Reminiscences, page 496.)

"So very difficult a matter is it to trace and find out the truth of anything by history." -- Plutarch
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05-08-2021, 07:12 AM
Post: #1783
RE: Who is this person?
   

Who is this person?

“The honest man, tho' e'er sae poor,
Is king o' men for a' that” Robert Burns
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05-08-2021, 07:39 AM
Post: #1784
RE: Who is this person?
Is this a 19th century person?
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05-08-2021, 12:19 PM
Post: #1785
RE: Who is this person?
It looks to me like Joseph "Uncle Joe" Cannon, Speaker of the House from 1903-1911 and from Illinois.

Best
Rob

Abraham Lincoln in the only man, dead or alive, with whom I could have spent five years without one hour of boredom.
--Ida M. Tarbell

I want the respect of intelligent men, but I will choose for myself the intelligent.
--Carl Sandburg
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