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The Spur Question
02-23-2018, 08:36 PM
Post: #106
RE: The Spur Question
(02-23-2018 09:16 AM)L Verge Wrote:  When it comes to the bitter end for results from the higher-ups, I usually don't.

That may be so, My Little Rebel Pal, but your contributions here have earned you the respect and admiration of everyone who has a serious interest in this subject. You've brought a wealth of knowledge to these studies.

You're ruthless pursuit of trivia answers be damned.....

"There are few subjects that ignite more casual, uninformed bigotry and condescension from elites in this nation more than Dixie - Jonah Goldberg"
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Yesterday, 05:32 AM
Post: #107
RE: The Spur Question
Ditto!

So when is this "Old Enough To Know Better" supposed to kick in?
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Yesterday, 05:33 AM
Post: #108
RE: The Spur Question
Many thanks to Steve for sending these old newspaper accounts.

Steve writes, "In a recent conversation the subject of Pvt. Jacob Soles carrying Lincoln's body from the theater to the Peterson House. I found these newspaper interviews given by him in 1915, 1933, and 1935 that I thought should be posted to the forum. Note in his 1933 interview he claims an actress was flirting on center stage when Lincoln was shot, not Harry Hawk. Also in his 1915 account, Soles claimed that Booth's spur got caught in the flag draping the box during his escape but twenty years later in his 1935 account he claims that is a myth and there was no flag covering the President's box. He also claimed in his 1933 account that Lincoln spoke as they were moving him. Needless to say, I do not believe Soles' accounts at all.

So far, the only soldier's account of being at Lincoln's box and then travelling with the body to Peterson House which I can find any kind of independent contemporary corroboration is that of Capt. Edwin Bedee of the 12th New Hampshire Infantry. (May 1866 note by Edwin Stanton in War Department Commissions Branch correspondence - B462)."

[Image: soles1.jpg]

[Image: soles2.jpg]

[Image: soles3.jpg]
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Yesterday, 10:51 AM (This post was last modified: Yesterday 10:52 AM by L Verge.)
Post: #109
RE: The Spur Question
I noticed that the third account has Lincoln shot at 8:45 (vs. 10:15). It also has the wounded President falling forward and laying on the balustrade of the box, and the kicker to me is that Soles claims that they carried the President out of the rear door of Ford's Theatre (into Baptist Alley?). Don't you love first-person accounts?

(Yesterday 05:32 AM)Gene C Wrote:  Ditto!

Joe and Gene - Thank you so much for the kind comments.
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Yesterday, 01:54 PM
Post: #110
RE: The Spur Question
As for carrying the President to the Petersen House, I think the names I have seen most often in books and articles are Jacob Soles, John Corey, Jacob Griffiths, and William Sample. Yet, according to Tim Good, Soles is the only one of the four men to make this claim. And this claim didn't come until the 20th century and is obviously very unreliable as Steve's articles show. It's pretty clear we simply do not know all of the men who carried the President across the street. The doctors were certainly involved, but the names of the persons who assisted them remain a mystery to this day IMO.
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Yesterday, 03:31 PM (This post was last modified: Yesterday 04:06 PM by Steve.)
Post: #111
RE: The Spur Question
The references for the three articles above that Roger posted for me are, in the order he posted them:

1. The Pittsburgh Press 12 Feb. 1933 pg. 12

2. Bradford Evening Star and the Bradford Daily Record (PA) 12 Feb. 1935 pg. 1 (yes, both names are listed at the top for some reason)

3. The Pittsburgh Press 11 Oct. 1915 pg. 4


Getting back to Roger's point about the other three men in his unit not mentioning carrying Lincoln with Soles. A genealogist transcribed a copy of Jabez Griffith's (called "Jacob" by Soles) obituary in the 18 Jan. 1898 edition of the McKeesport Daily News and posted it online:

Capt. Jabez Griffiths died at 2:15 o'clock this morning at the family residence, 313 Penny avenue, aged 52 years.

He had been ailing for the past six months. Last fall he spent eight days at the South Side hospital, Pittsburgh, where an operation was to have been performed, but upon investigation it was considered unwise and the patient returned home. Since then he has been confined to his home a great sufferer and his condition gradually becoming worse.

This morning the doctor held an autopsy and ascertained that Capt. Griffiths' death was cuased by a cancer.

Captain Griffiths spend his whole life in this vicinty, living for many years at Camden. He was a riverman all his life and was well known in Louisville, Cincinnati and in most of the river towns. He was a member of the Masters' and Pilots' association of Pittsburgh and of Allegheny Lodge No. 375. F & A Masons and Vigilant circle, No. 141, Protected Home Circle. He is survived by a wife, one sone, John S. and four daughters, Sadie, (Mrs. William Menke, of Homestead), Laura, Minnie and Mabel.

Funeral services will be held at the First M. E. church, Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Rev. Eaton and hatch officiating. The interment will be in Richland cemetery, Dravosburg. Friends and relatives are respectfully invited to attend the funeral.


Unfortunately, issues of the McKeesport Daily News aren't in the newspaper databases that I use, so I couldn't look for the obituaries or articles about the other two men. But one would think that at least one of the three men would've told somebody else or leave some kind of record of their role in the Lincoln assassination, if it happened.
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