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Assassination Trivia
04-13-2013, 12:22 PM
Post: #466
RE: Assassination Trivia
If I remember correctly, Samuel Cox was into horse racing and also jousting tournaments in the days after the Civil War. I wonder if Grey Medock was one of his mounts in these fields.

Jousting tournaments were big events here in Maryland up until the 1960s, and there are still some held in Charles and St. Mary's Counties. Prince George's County is also known as the home of American Thoroughbred racing. The State of Maryland has always been known for its fine horse flesh.
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04-17-2013, 07:43 PM
Post: #467
RE: Assassination Trivia
(04-13-2013 12:22 PM)Laurie Verge Wrote:  If I remember correctly, Samuel Cox was into horse racing and also jousting tournaments in the days after the Civil War. I wonder if Grey Medock was one of his mounts in these fields.

Jousting tournaments were big events here in Maryland up until the 1960s, and there are still some held in Charles and St. Mary's Counties. Prince George's County is also known as the home of American Thoroughbred racing. The State of Maryland has always been known for its fine horse flesh.

Up through the 1980's, Maryland was the #2 state in the country for the horse racing industry, second only to Kentucky. Maryland has dropped way off being surpassed by several states, including New Jersey....how embarassing.
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04-17-2013, 07:54 PM
Post: #468
RE: Assassination Trivia
Don't forget Virginia, birthplace of Secretariat!


Ridgeway - grandson of Secretariat, Hanover County, VA
at his Grandpa's birthplace, "The Meadows"

[Image: photos191s.jpg]

"The Past is a foreign country...they do things differently there" - L. P. Hartley
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04-17-2013, 07:57 PM
Post: #469
RE: Assassination Trivia
Not only are we popular in KY for horse racing, we're pretty good at college basketball.

So when is this "Old Enough To Know Better" supposed to kick in?
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04-18-2013, 06:52 AM
Post: #470
RE: Assassination Trivia
Roger Powell, a ranger and historian at Ford's said that a horse blind in one eye was not that uncommon during the 1800s. Any of us that have had to go out in a field and try to get a horse that lets you get within a few feet, then takes off know the frustration. An owner would sometimes put out an eye so they could approach a horse on that side without being seen. My daughter cares for a number of horses and one is blind in one eye, and it is a very frisky animal, difficult to manage. Approaching from the blind side works.
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04-18-2013, 07:15 AM
Post: #471
RE: Assassination Trivia
Black Caviar, unquestionably one of the greatest of all time, retired yesterday after going 25 for 25 in her racing career. She was not that well-known in the USA as she never raced here, but she was something to behold. I watched many of her races on TVG. The only time I remember her almost losing a race was when the jockey eased up on her thinking he had the race won. That was a squeaker as she just barely held on.
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04-18-2013, 07:55 AM (This post was last modified: 04-18-2013 07:57 AM by BettyO.)
Post: #472
RE: Assassination Trivia
Quote:Roger Powell, a ranger and historian at Ford's said that a horse blind in one eye was not that uncommon during the 1800s. Any of us that have had to go out in a field and try to get a horse that lets you get within a few feet, then takes off know the frustration. An owner would sometimes put out an eye so they could approach a horse on that side without being seen. My daughter cares for a number of horses and one is blind in one eye, and it is a very frisky animal, difficult to manage. Approaching from the blind side works.


OMG - how CRUEL !!

My horses always neighed and came to me when I whistled or called. Occasional treats work even more wonders - but you can't give them too many (especially sugar) or they will develop a nipping habit if they don't get it! Kindness and bonding with animals work better than cruelty....it's a shame more Victorians didn't realize that!

"The Past is a foreign country...they do things differently there" - L. P. Hartley
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04-20-2013, 03:24 PM
Post: #473
RE: Assassination Trivia
What was the "Booth barometer?"
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04-21-2013, 05:03 AM
Post: #474
RE: Assassination Trivia
Hint #1: This has to do with something John Wilkes Booth did.
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04-21-2013, 11:00 AM
Post: #475
RE: Assassination Trivia
The term was coined by William Withers Jr. He was the orchestra leader of Ford’s Theatre. As Booth was trying to make his escape out the stage door after shooting Lincoln, he smashed into Withers and slashed through his coat with a knife, leaving a good scar on his arm. Withers called it the “Booth Barometer.” Every time there was a storm brewing, the injury would hurt.
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04-21-2013, 12:02 PM
Post: #476
RE: Assassination Trivia
You are correct, Kate! That's it!
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04-21-2013, 04:48 PM
Post: #477
RE: Assassination Trivia
Excellent, Kate.....A+
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05-01-2013, 07:31 AM
Post: #478
RE: Assassination Trivia
Which employee of Ford's Theatre stood 6' 5"?
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05-01-2013, 07:41 AM
Post: #479
RE: Assassination Trivia
(05-01-2013 07:31 AM)RJNorton Wrote:  Which employee of Ford's Theatre stood 6' 5"?

Joseph Sessford?
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05-01-2013, 08:37 AM
Post: #480
RE: Assassination Trivia
You are correct, Dave. Good job.

Source: Jim and Rich's book.
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