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Assassination Trivia
04-10-2021, 04:59 AM
Post: #2281
RE: Assassination Trivia
Steve and Steve -- I think Bill said it all when he noted, "While introduced at the trial, apparently Tidwell, Hall and Gaddy did not view them as relevant to connect the conspiracy to Richmond, as neither Mrs. Hudspeth nor Mr. Selby are mentioned in Come Retribution." IMO, it was a real stretch for the prosecution to introduce these letters during the trial. Theodore Roscoe writes, "What did they (the letters) mean? What did they prove? General Dix himself took the first letter to be a hoax."

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04-10-2021, 05:26 AM
Post: #2282
RE: Assassination Trivia
I dont want to bring up red herrings but this Charles Selby ... I see that he's been mentioned before on this forum . I havent read all the posts but there doesnt seem to be a lot about him.
A google seems to only point to a Charles Selby who wrote (or produced) The Marble Heart, the play where Booth seemed to make nasty faces at Lincoln when he was in the audience.
But that Selby died in 1863 in London.

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Is king o' men for a' that” Robert Burns
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04-10-2021, 03:23 PM
Post: #2283
RE: Assassination Trivia
The prosecution in the conspiracy trial also introduced some questionable evidence that was found at Mrs. Scott's boardinghouse. What was this?
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04-10-2021, 05:40 PM
Post: #2284
RE: Assassination Trivia
(04-10-2021 03:23 PM)RJNorton Wrote:  The prosecution in the conspiracy trial also introduced some questionable evidence that was found at Mrs. Scott's boardinghouse. What was this?
Ned Spangler boarded at Mrs. Scott's, as did another stagehand at Ford's, Jake Rittersbach. Rittersbach, who for years wrangled to get a piece of the reward money, claimed to be the first to verbally identify the assassin as Booth, and said that Spangler struck Rittersbach in the mouth told him to be quiet. Spangler and Rittersbach were arrested at Mrs. Scott's. (Rittersbach was later released.) As I recall, Spangler's possessions at Mrs. Scott's were confiscated. as well. Is that where the rope used to implicate (and convict) Spangler was found?
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04-11-2021, 04:58 AM
Post: #2285
RE: Assassination Trivia
Yes, you nailed it again, Bill. Kudos. The "suspicious" rope was found in Spangler's belongings at Mrs. Scott's. This is where Spangler took his meals. Allegedly the rope could be used to assist in the kidnapping or assassination of Lincoln.
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04-11-2021, 12:44 PM (This post was last modified: 04-11-2021 12:47 PM by wpbinzel.)
Post: #2286
RE: Assassination Trivia
Kudos also must go to Tom Bogar and his book, Backstage at the Lincoln Assassination - The Untold Story of the Actors and Stagehands at Ford's Theatre.
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04-13-2021, 06:09 PM
Post: #2287
RE: Assassination Trivia
This man wrote a book on the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. What is his name?

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04-13-2021, 09:45 PM (This post was last modified: 04-13-2021 09:51 PM by Rob Wick.)
Post: #2288
RE: Assassination Trivia
I've seen this picture before, but I can't remember who it is, so I'll guess either David Rankin Barbee or Theodore Roscoe.

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Rob

Abraham Lincoln in the only man, dead or alive, with whom I could have spent five years without one hour of boredom.
--Ida M. Tarbell

I want the respect of intelligent men, but I will choose for myself the intelligent.
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04-14-2021, 04:55 AM
Post: #2289
RE: Assassination Trivia
Good job, Rob. It's Theodore Roscoe who is the author of Web of Conspiracy. In the latest Surratt Courier Roscoe's volume (500+ pages) was listed in the "must have" books, and I sure would agree with that.
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Yesterday, 05:38 PM
Post: #2290
RE: Assassination Trivia
Please...no googling.

I can think of only one instance in which lemonade and cakes were a part of the assassination saga. In what situation were these mentioned?
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Yesterday, 06:43 PM
Post: #2291
RE: Assassination Trivia
This probably isn't what you are looking for but I have an article saved from the LA Times on a much broader topic. It's written by Susan Moeller back in 2007. She talks about the hanging of the Lincoln conspirators and mentions that after the hanging the crowd outside the prison celebrated with lemonade and cake.

Or was there testimony at the trial by a witness who saw Mary Surratt serve lemonade and cakes to one of the conspirators?
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