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Children's Books
04-27-2019, 04:41 AM
Post: #31
RE: Children's Books
(04-26-2019 03:51 PM)Gene C Wrote:  Abe Lincoln Grows Up by Carl Sandburg

This book is made from the first twenty seven chapters of the original two volume biography of Abraham Lincoln written by Sandburg in 1926.

This book was published in 1955, has 222 pages, with several imaginative illustrations by Jack Daugherty.
For older children, but all ages will enjoy reading it. Sanburg's poetical writing style shines through, it's a little different than we are used to today. This is one of the things that makes it memorable, and sets it apart from other books about Lincoln. His writing helps carry your imagination away, you can see Abraham working in the farm fields, reading in front of the fireplace, splitting logs for a fence. Covers the time period from Lincoln's grandfather moving to Kentucky to Lincoln leaving home when he is 21. There is a lot of interesting background material that helps make the story come alive.

I found the chapter about the religious community where Abraham lived as a boy very interesting. You see the influence of his community church and his home bible learning have on his entire life. Sandburg tells you as much about the way of life and environment Lincoln grew up in as he does the specific events and experiences Lincoln had. Combined together, you see the factors that helped make Lincoln a great man. You will learn how Lincoln came to have an interest in the law when he was in his late teens.

I would consider this one of the classic books on Lincoln's early life.
Dave Grimm found this for me when he was at a library book sale.

https://www.amazon.com/Abe-Lincoln-Grows...6-fkmrnull

Classic Lincoln reading-doesn’t get any better. I believe it was Sandburg’s intention to cover Lincoln’s boyhood first (and only)-but thankfully he didn’t end there.

Bill Nash
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04-27-2019, 08:27 AM (This post was last modified: 04-27-2019 10:18 AM by Gene C.)
Post: #32
RE: Children's Books
(04-26-2019 08:11 PM)Eva Elisabeth Wrote:  Thank you as always for an insightful review, Gene. This one sounds good - I do not recall reading much (actually at all) on the influence of his community church on him in his youth - is that fictional?

It's not fictional. The role of the church in the community has changed a bit over the years when it was a center of social life as well as source for moral guidance and encouragement during the challenges life presents. Located about one mile from his home, sermons given by traveling preachers, it is his first look at life outside of his immediate family. The stories from the bible and their moral teachings stay with him through his entire life. His speech about slavery and the impact on the country, his famous House Divided Speech, the phrase "a house divided against itself can not stand" is straight from the teachings of Jesus.

Much in this book is borrowed from Sandburg's "Abraham Lincoln: The Prairie Years" Chpt 17, pages 59-64
https://archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli...8/page/n79

So when is this "Old Enough To Know Better" supposed to kick in?
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04-27-2019, 02:10 PM
Post: #33
RE: Children's Books
If you notice, the book comes from the Digital Library of India, which I guess is how they are able to get around American copyright law, given that the book is not in the public domain. Of course, Harcourt has had so many iterations over the years, I'm not sure exactly who would hold the copyright right now. I'm assuming Sandburg's grandchildren still likely get royalties if any are ever available.

Best
Rob

Abraham Lincoln in the only man, dead or alive, with whom I could have spent five years without one hour of boredom.
--Ida M. Tarbell

I want the respect of intelligent men, but I will choose for myself the intelligent.
--Carl Sandburg
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04-28-2019, 10:12 AM (This post was last modified: 04-28-2019 10:13 AM by Eva Elisabeth.)
Post: #34
RE: Children's Books
Thanks, Gene - I read the "Prairie Years" long ago. Yes, I do know Abraham Lincoln knew to strikingly quote the Bible. Influence means more to me however, opinions, or active " faithful lifestyle" e.g. From his youth I rather recall the "atheistic" thoughts.
Rob - the copyright should expire by 2036...
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04-28-2019, 02:07 PM (This post was last modified: 04-28-2019 02:11 PM by Gene C.)
Post: #35
RE: Children's Books
I'm currently reading The Religion of Abraham Lincoln" by William Wolf.
Lincoln may have had atheistic thoughts, but I'm not convinced these thought developed into beliefs.

Hope to finish the book by next week and will comment on it then..

So when is this "Old Enough To Know Better" supposed to kick in?
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04-28-2019, 02:44 PM
Post: #36
RE: Children's Books
(04-28-2019 02:07 PM)Gene C Wrote:  I'm currently reading The Religion of Abraham Lincoln" by William Wolf.
Lincoln may have had atheistic thoughts, but I'm not convinced these thought developed into beliefs.

Hope to finish the book by next week and will comment on it then..

I will probably take a beating for asking this, but don't most of us have atheistic thoughts at some point in our lives?
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03-02-2020, 09:02 AM (This post was last modified: 03-02-2020 11:17 AM by Gene C.)
Post: #37
RE: Children's Books
Tad Lincoln by T Morrison Longstreth

For ages 10+ years, written in 1944 with 280 pages, no illustrations.

Well written, historical fiction, mainly about Tad's years in the White House.
The author does a good job of describing some of the experiences Tad faced while growing up, with the focus not so much in what happened, but on the consequences, and lessons learned. His creative and compassionate side are shown, as well as his spoiled, mischievous, strong willed nature.

No mention of his speech impediment. His lack of education receives little notice, other than he does not care for his teachers.
His close relationship with his father is mentioned many times, how he easily makes friends with the guards and soldiers, and how Mrs Keckley is often a substitute mother figure.

In the postscript the author claims historical accuracy for many of the events in Tad's life and refers to books by Elizabeth Keckley, Carl Sandburg, Francis Carpenter, Julia Taft, and David Homer Bates.

There are two stories about Tad that get some attention in this book, that I have not been able to find the source or verify they ever happened. The first is Tad hosing down Secretary of War Stanton because Tad was angry with Stanton on how he talked to his father. The earliest source I can find on that is Wayne Whipple's book on Tad Lincoln from 1926. The other involves Tad taking the Confederate flag that was captured by Elmer Ellsworth, and secretly hanging it on the balcony of Bud and Holly Taft's house. I do not recall seeing that story anywhere.

If you are interested in this aspect of Lincoln's family life in the White House, this is an interesting, but fictional account of many things Tad probably experienced. If you want a more historical perspective, Julia Taft's 'Tad Lincoln's Father' is a better choice.

Available on Amazon, I paid $8
https://www.amazon.com/Tad-Lincoln-Presi...563&sr=8-7

Also available for free, online at Internet Archives
https://archive.org/details/tadlincolnpr...g/mode/2up

So when is this "Old Enough To Know Better" supposed to kick in?
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03-02-2020, 09:43 AM
Post: #38
RE: Children's Books
(03-02-2020 09:02 AM)Gene C Wrote:  Tad Lincoln by T Morrison Longstreth

For ages 10+ years, written in 1944 with 280 pages, no illustrations.

Well written, historical fiction, mainly about Tad's years in the White House.
The author does a good job of describing some of the experiences Tad faced while growing up, with the focus not so much in what happened, but on the consequences, and lessons learned. His creative and compassionate side are shown, as well as his spoiled, mischievous, strong willed nature.

No mention of his speech impediment. His lack of education receives little notice, other than he does not care for his teachers.
His close relationship with his father is mentioned many times, how he easily makes friends with the guards and soldiers, and how Mrs Keckley is often a substitute mother figure.

In the postscript the author claims historical accuracy for many of the events in Tad's life and refers to books by Elizabeth Keckley, Carl Sandburg, Francis Carpenter, Julia Taft, and David Homer Bates.

There are two stories about Tad that get some attention in this book, that I have not been able to find the source or verify they ever happened. The first is Tad hosing down Secretary of Was Stanton because Tad was angry with Stanton on how he talked to his father. The earliest source I can find on that is Wayne Whipple's book on Tad Lincoln from 1926. The other involves Tad taking the Confederate flag that was captured by Elmer Ellsworth, and secretly hanging it on the balcony of Bud and Holly Taft's house. I do not recall seeing that story anywhere.

If you are interested in this aspect of Lincoln's family life in the White House, this is an interesting, but fictional account of many things Tad probably experienced. If you want a more historical perspective, Julia Taft's 'Tad Lincoln's Father' is a better choice.

Available on Amazon, I paid $8
https://www.amazon.com/Tad-Lincoln-Presi...563&sr=8-7

Also available for free, online at Internet Archives
https://archive.org/details/tadlincolnpr...g/mode/2up

Since Stanton was nicknamed "Mars"- I guess its just appropriate that Tad "hosed" him down. Smile

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03-03-2020, 09:15 AM
Post: #39
RE: Children's Books
(03-02-2020 09:43 AM)LincolnMan Wrote:  
(03-02-2020 09:02 AM)Gene C Wrote:  Tad Lincoln by T Morrison Longstreth

For ages 10+ years, written in 1944 with 280 pages, no illustrations.

Well written, historical fiction, mainly about Tad's years in the White House.
The author does a good job of describing some of the experiences Tad faced while growing up, with the focus not so much in what happened, but on the consequences, and lessons learned. His creative and compassionate side are shown, as well as his spoiled, mischievous, strong willed nature.

No mention of his speech impediment. His lack of education receives little notice, other than he does not care for his teachers.
His close relationship with his father is mentioned many times, how he easily makes friends with the guards and soldiers, and how Mrs Keckley is often a substitute mother figure.

In the postscript the author claims historical accuracy for many of the events in Tad's life and refers to books by Elizabeth Keckley, Carl Sandburg, Francis Carpenter, Julia Taft, and David Homer Bates.

There are two stories about Tad that get some attention in this book, that I have not been able to find the source or verify they ever happened. The first is Tad hosing down Secretary of Was Stanton because Tad was angry with Stanton on how he talked to his father. The earliest source I can find on that is Wayne Whipple's book on Tad Lincoln from 1926. The other involves Tad taking the Confederate flag that was captured by Elmer Ellsworth, and secretly hanging it on the balcony of Bud and Holly Taft's house. I do not recall seeing that story anywhere.

If you are interested in this aspect of Lincoln's family life in the White House, this is an interesting, but fictional account of many things Tad probably experienced. If you want a more historical perspective, Julia Taft's 'Tad Lincoln's Father' is a better choice.

Available on Amazon, I paid $8
https://www.amazon.com/Tad-Lincoln-Presi...563&sr=8-7

Also available for free, online at Internet Archives
https://archive.org/details/tadlincolnpr...g/mode/2up

Since Stanton was nicknamed "Mars"- I guess its just appropriate that Tad "hosed" him down. Smile

Tad and his mischievous acts had been a favorite of mine. And Lincoln almost never admonished him for anything.
But Tad could also be a generous boy. He invited street kids to play with him and was an unconscious little leader of class barrier breaking.
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03-03-2020, 09:31 AM
Post: #40
RE: Children's Books
(03-03-2020 09:15 AM)Mylye2222 Wrote:  Tad and his mischievous acts had been a favorite of mine. And Lincoln almost never admonished him for anything.
But Tad could also be a generous boy. He invited street kids to play with him and was an unconscious little leader of class barrier breaking.

Regarding Tad, John Hay wrote, "He had a very bad opinion of books and no opinion of discipline."
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03-14-2020, 05:54 PM
Post: #41
RE: Children's Books
Civil War Spies by Camilla Wilson

I purchased this children's book for one reason. The cover is a photograph of Lewis Powell. Powell is mentioned in this book six times and only in the chapter about Mary Surratt. No real reason why he is on the cover since he is not the focus of any of the chapters.
Softbound, published in 2010, with 102 pages.

There are seven chapters featuring Allan Pinkerton, Sam Davis, John Scobell, Mary Surratt, Benjamin Franklin Stringfellow, Elizabeth Van Lew, and Harriet Tubman. My favorite is Elizabeth Van Lew, a union spy who lived in Richmond, VA.

Mary Surratt has the longest chapter at 23 pages, so I will focus on that. The author seemed non committal on her guilt or innocence as an assassination conspirator, nothing much as to why she would be considered a spy, other than her son was a courier and spy. Anything much against Mary is presented pretty much as guilt by association. Evidence against Mary is either lightly presented or ignored.

A decent introduction for young people (middle to high school age) to the behind the scenes activities of spying during the Civil War.

Available on Amazon. Don't let the cover photo fool you. There is very little in this book about Lewis Powell. I bought mine used for $5.42
https://www.amazon.com/Civil-Spies-Behin...56&sr=1-13

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09-06-2020, 07:28 AM (This post was last modified: 09-06-2020 07:29 AM by Gene C.)
Post: #42
RE: Children's Books
Detective Pinkerton and Mr. Lincoln

by William Wise, copyright 1964, with 64 pages
nice pen and ink illustrations by Hoot von Zitzewitzt. He did a lot of cover art for sci-fi books, but the illustrations did little to add to the drama of this story.

Suitable for ages 9 and up.
To me the book was short on excitement. The story was told fairly well, it just lacked the tension and the drama. You know it's a dangerous situation, but you don't feel it. The involvement of Timothy Webster and Kate Warne could have been been developed better. It's a suspense story without the suspense.

Other than that, it was OK.

William Wise wrote several books for children, fiction and non-fiction.

Available on Amazon -
https://www.amazon.com/Detective-Pinkert...lliam+Wise

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09-06-2020, 09:09 AM
Post: #43
RE: Children's Books
Thanks for your review, Gene.
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09-06-2020, 01:27 PM
Post: #44
RE: Children's Books
Gene: your reviews are always a delight. You have certainly carved out a nice corner here in the Lincoln Symposium.

Bill Nash
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09-07-2020, 06:56 AM
Post: #45
RE: Children's Books
I agree. I appreciate very much this passive introduction to books, and your reviews and insights. Thank you, Gene.
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