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Children's Books
06-30-2021, 12:28 PM (This post was last modified: 06-30-2021 12:35 PM by Gene C.)
Post: #46
RE: Children's Books
Tad Lincoln by T Morris Longstreth

Going back up to post # 37, I have found another writer telling of the episode of Tad turning the water hose on Stanton. The story is in "Lincoln Talks" by Emanuel Hertz. His book was published in 1939, and he attributes the story to Thomas Pendel, the chief doorkeeper at the White House. He frequently looked after Tad, according to the web site Mr. Lincolns White House
http://www.mrlincolnswhitehouse.org/resi...4-unknown/

Here is the story from "Lincoln Talks" - Tad and Stanton p.215- 217.
https://archive.org/details/lincolntalks...4/mode/2up

Thomas Pendel later wrote a book entitled "Thirty Six Years In The White House" copyright 1901. The story of Tad is not recorded in that book. Copies of his book can also be found in the Internet Archives.

So when is this "Old Enough To Know Better" supposed to kick in?
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07-01-2021, 09:13 AM
Post: #47
RE: Children's Books
(06-30-2021 12:28 PM)Gene C Wrote:  Thomas Pendel later wrote a book entitled "Thirty Six Years In The White House" copyright 1901. The story of Tad is not recorded in that book. Copies of his book can also be found in the Internet Archives.

I have never understood why Emanuel Hertz put that story in his book. All that he had to do was check in Pendel's book to verify the story. And, then again, where did Hertz get the story? Somebody had to write it.

I posted the story as true and I apologized to Laurie Verge (and others) for my mistake.

"So very difficult a matter is it to trace and find out the truth of anything by history." -- Plutarch
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07-18-2021, 04:58 PM (This post was last modified: 07-18-2021 08:21 PM by Gene C.)
Post: #48
RE: Children's Books
The Boy Lincoln by William Stoddard

This book was written by one of Lincoln's private secretary's. Stoddard also handled most of Mrs. Lincoln's mail. Stoddard would later wrote over 100 books, most of them for boys.

This one, published in 1905 with 240+ pages. It is not a history or work of non-fiction of Lincoln's life in Indiana, it is a story, and Stoddard is a good story teller.
This starts at the death of Nancy Lincoln, when Abraham's father, Thomas, leaves Abraham, Sarah and Dennis alone in their cabin in the woods, going to convince Sara Bush Johnson to be his new wife and mother for his children.

In between, Stoddard paints a realistic picture of life on a small farm. The hard work, Lincoln working for neighbors to help the family financially, his desire to read and learn, are all described.

The story ends with Lincoln as an older teenager carrying a traveler across the Ohio River who leaves him with these words of encouragement,
"Abe", said the former, handing him a silver dollar, "take that for yourself: I have paid Mr. Taylor. Now, I'll tell you one thing for you to remember: You are fit for something better than rowing a scow. God has put a great deal of brains into your head, You must learn to use them. It is remarkable that you have read so many books, away out here in the wilderness. Go on! Read, read, read! Make the most of your self. Be a man! This country of ours is dreadfully short of men. Good bye."
He was gone, baggage and all, and Abe stood still, looking after him.
"I didn't even get his name", he said to himself.


This is an enjoyable book to read, but it is a book written more for young people than adults.
I purchased my 100 + year old copy online from Books On The Square, in Springfield, IL - https://www.booksonthesquare.com/

Reprints are available from Amazon -
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/053079...=pd_gw_unk

The book is also available on Interenet Archive.
https://archive.org/details/boylincol00s...7/mode/2up

So when is this "Old Enough To Know Better" supposed to kick in?
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07-19-2021, 11:45 AM
Post: #49
RE: Children's Books
(07-18-2021 04:58 PM)Gene C Wrote:  The Boy Lincoln by William Stoddard


The story ends with Lincoln as an older teenager carrying a traveler across the Ohio River who leaves him with these words of encouragement,
[i]"Abe", said the former, handing him a silver dollar, "take that for yourself: I have paid Mr. Taylor. Now, I'll tell you one thing for you to remember: You are fit for something better than rowing a scow. God has put a great deal of brains into your head, You must learn to use them. It is remarkable that you have read so many books, away out here in the wilderness. Go on! Read, read, read! Make the most of your self. Be a man! This country of ours is dreadfully short of men. Good bye."

Roger previously posted the following similar story:

In 1866 Josiah Gilbert Holland's The Life of Abraham Lincoln was published. Holland wrote:

"He (Lincoln) had learned the use of tools, and possessed considerable mechanical talent, as will appear in some other acts of his life. Of the voyage and its results we have no knowledge, but an incident occurred before starting which he related in later life to his Secretary of State, Mr. Seward, that made a very marked and pleasant impression upon his memory. As he stood at the landing, a steamer approached, coming down the river. At the same time two passengers came to the river's bank who wished to be taken out to the packet with their luggage. Looking among the boats at the landing, they singled out Abraham's, and asked him to scull them to the steamer. This he did, and after seeing them and their trunks on board, he had the pleasure of receiving upon the bottom of his boat, before he shoved off, a silver half dollar from each of his passengers. "I could scarcely believe my eyes," said Mr. Lincoln, in telling the story. "You may think it was a very little thing," continued he, "but it was a most important incident in my life. I could scarcely believe that I, a poor boy, had earned a dollar in less than a day. The world seemed wider and fairer before me. I was a more hopeful and confident being from that time."

"So very difficult a matter is it to trace and find out the truth of anything by history." -- Plutarch
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12-14-2021, 09:38 PM
Post: #50
RE: Children's Books
Abe Lincoln Gets His Chance by Francis Cavanah.
Mrs Cavanah wrote several childrens books

This was a Weekly Reader Children's Book Club book, published in 1959 with 92 pages. Reading level of 3rd-5th grade. It covers the time from his birth till he meets with his step-mother before he goes to Washington. Written well, I found it interesting and mainly factual. Ms Cavanah digs a little bit deeper into Lincoln's personality and character than most children's books.

Several, simple illustrations. As I was reading this it seemed so familiar, I can't be sure, but I wouldn't be surprised if I read this when I was in school. I purchased my copy on line, in very good condition, with nice dust cover for $1.99 plus s&h.
https://www.amazon.com/Abe-Lincoln-Gets-...367&sr=8-1

It's a also available on Internet Archives. For a nice short sample, go the the last page of the book and read the page where Abraham says goodbye to his stepmother.
- https://archive.org/details/abelincolnge...ew=theater

So when is this "Old Enough To Know Better" supposed to kick in?
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04-24-2022, 02:37 PM (This post was last modified: 04-24-2022 02:38 PM by Gene C.)
Post: #51
RE: Children's Books
Honey - The Dog Who Saved Abraham Lincoln
written by Shari Swanson, illustrated by Chuck Groenink

The author claims this is a true story, and the story source is acknowledged as coming from this book, "The Boyhood of Abraham Lincoln" by J Rogers Gore from the spoken narrative of Austin Gollaher
https://archive.org/details/boyhoodofabr...ew=theater

Much of the content of that book is questionable, and is the only known source for the story. https://rogerjnorton.com/LincolnDiscussi...search.php

It's an interesting children's story and nicely illustrated. You can view the book and hear the story here - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ccVAy060fBM

I'm dog sitting for a month , and we both enjoyed the book. It's available through several different book sellers. Here is the book info page from Amazon
https://www.amazon.com/Honey-Dog-Who-Sav...514&sr=8-1

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[Image: gene2.jpg]

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04-24-2022, 06:07 PM (This post was last modified: 04-24-2022 06:09 PM by Eva Elisabeth.)
Post: #52
RE: Children's Books
Great photos, Gene - your foster dog visibly enjoyed the reading session! He also looks like a descendant of Honey (at least regarding the color of his coat). Love the illustrations!
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04-24-2022, 09:58 PM (This post was last modified: 04-24-2022 09:59 PM by Susan Higginbotham.)
Post: #53
RE: Children's Books
(04-24-2022 02:37 PM)Gene C Wrote:  Honey - The Dog Who Saved Abraham Lincoln
written by Shari Swanson, illustrated by Chuck Groenink

The author claims this is a true story, and the story source is acknowledged as coming from this book, "The Boyhood of Abraham Lincoln" by J Rogers Gore from the spoken narrative of Austin Gollaher
https://archive.org/details/boyhoodofabr...ew=theater

Much of the content of that book is questionable, and is the only known source for the story. https://rogerjnorton.com/LincolnDiscussi...search.php

It's an interesting children's story and nicely illustrated. You can view the book and hear the story here - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ccVAy060fBM

I'm dog sitting for a month , and we both enjoyed the book. It's available through several different book sellers. Here is the book info page from Amazon
https://www.amazon.com/Honey-Dog-Who-Sav...514&sr=8-1

I hope your canine client will be sharing his or her review.
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04-25-2022, 04:55 AM
Post: #54
RE: Children's Books
I had this story in my notes:

Abraham Lincoln's boyhood dog was named Honey. On Monday morning, March 8, 1830, during the Lincolns' move from Indiana to Illinois, at Vincennes they headed for Haines' ferry, drove the caravan onto the ferry, and crossed the Wabash River into Illinois. Here, the Lincolns' dog, Honey, jumped overboard, landed on a thin sheet of ice, was about to drown, but Abraham, seeing the crisis, jumped into the icy water and saved Honey's life.

The story's source is a letter in the June 20, 1938, issue of Lincoln Lore.

https://www.friendsofthelincolncollectio...-20_01.pdf
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