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04-21-2017, 10:43 AM
Post: #1
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Don't let the words Glenn Beck sway you from reading this article. It was written by an 11th grader from Kilgore High School and the winner of our “Before They Were Famous” essay writing contest exploring the early life Abraham Lincoln.

It thought it was a sweet tribute and am happy to hear students being impacted by such a great historical figure.


http://www.glennbeck.com/2017/04/19/abra...GB-Control

" Any man who thinks he can be happy and prosperous by letting the American Government take care of him; better take a closer look at the American Indian." - Henry Ford
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04-21-2017, 11:01 AM
Post: #2
RE: Tribute
Thank you for posting this, Mike. It reminded me of my grade school years growing up in Illinois. The teachers at Holmes School in Oak Park all emphasized Lincoln's pre-Presidential years. My third or fourth grade teacher loved to talk about Ann Rutledge. As I recall, I do not think I had a teacher who discussed/taught his Presidency until high school. Personally, I find the early years just as interesting, if not more so, than his Presidential years.
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04-21-2017, 12:21 PM (This post was last modified: 04-21-2017 12:23 PM by Gene C.)
Post: #3
RE: Tribute
Agree with you Roger.
I had been to Springfield, New Salem and his Boyhood Home in Indiana, but it was such a much greater experience to go with a group from the forum who just new so much and shared with everyone. I got so much more out of the 3 days together than when I had just gone on my own with the family. It wasn't just what I learned from Joe, Dave, Scott, Rob & Bill (and their wives), it was the desire after the trip to learn more. And we went places I never would have thought about going to see. That, and a great group of people to meet and become friends with. It is a wonderful time we would like to share with others.

Thanks for sharing the article Mike. Like you said, it is nice to see students being impacted by such a great historical figure.
He still impacts me.

So when is this "Old Enough To Know Better" supposed to kick in?
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04-21-2017, 12:58 PM
Post: #4
RE: Tribute
Thanks for sharing. Excellent t shirts Beck is selling, I think I might buy one. I just need to go to New Salem and maybe tag along on Gene's Springfield tour this fall.

Thomas Kearney, Professional Photobomber.
New Twitter handle name: @ThomasE_Kearney
Kearney '32 Get America Back On Track
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04-22-2017, 08:29 AM
Post: #5
RE: Tribute
Great essay written by a young person! I like the shirt too. I don't know much about Mr. Beck but I thought he had expressed negative views if Lincoln; am I right?

Bill Nash
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04-22-2017, 10:57 AM
Post: #6
RE: Tribute
(04-21-2017 11:01 AM)RJNorton Wrote:  My third or fourth grade teacher loved to talk about Ann Rutledge.

Roger, do you recall some of the things that she said about Lincoln and Ann Rutledge?

"So very difficult a matter is it to trace and find out the truth of anything by history." -- Plutarch
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04-22-2017, 05:04 PM
Post: #7
RE: Tribute
David, I recall she emphasized that Ann Rutledge was both beautiful and smart. She said Ann Rutledge was the most attractive girl in New Salem. She stressed that all the residents of New Salem thought very highly of her, and that she had a very positive effect on Lincoln. And then she told us how depressed Abraham Lincoln was when she died so young. The teacher was passionate about the romance, and I remember the sadness in her voice when she told us about Ann dying. This was over 60 years ago, so I do not recall all the details she taught us.
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04-22-2017, 10:12 PM
Post: #8
RE: Tribute
Yes - very nice essay by a young student!
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Yesterday, 09:29 AM
Post: #9
RE: Tribute
I don't remember even being taught anything about Lincoln in any of my public education. Wow.

Bill Nash
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Yesterday, 07:02 PM
Post: #10
RE: Tribute
(04-22-2017 05:04 PM)RJNorton Wrote:  David, I recall she emphasized that Ann Rutledge was both beautiful and smart. She said Ann Rutledge was the most attractive girl in New Salem. She stressed that all the residents of New Salem thought very highly of her, and that she had a very positive effect on Lincoln. And then she told us how depressed Abraham Lincoln was when she died so young. The teacher was passionate about the romance, and I remember the sadness in her voice when she told us about Ann dying. This was over 60 years ago, so I do not recall all the details she taught us.

Roger, thanks. I think that she was right in all of what she said. You were lucky to have her as your teacher.

I also believe that if Abraham Lincoln had married Ann Rutledge, there would have been no possibility that he would have been President of the United States.

"So very difficult a matter is it to trace and find out the truth of anything by history." -- Plutarch
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Yesterday, 09:18 PM
Post: #11
RE: Tribute
(Yesterday 07:02 PM)David Lockmiller Wrote:  I also believe that if Abraham Lincoln had married Ann Rutledge, there would have been no possibility that he would have been President of the United States.

I can agree with that David. Despite what Herndon and others may have negatively said about Mary and their marriage, Mary was the one that helped him through the setbacks, and kept the ambition alive to keep trying. From the beginning she saw something about him that others didn't see.

So when is this "Old Enough To Know Better" supposed to kick in?
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