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Garrett Farm
08-27-2013, 07:36 AM
Post: #1
Garrett Farm
Hello Everyone! I am a newbie to this forum and have only been reading and studing the assassination of Lincoln a few months. I am totally addicted and have so many questions! I'm sure this has been discussed on this forum previously but can someone please direct me to a thread regarding why Booth and Herold decided to stay at the Garrett farm when they were offered transportation to leave? Smile
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08-27-2013, 08:01 AM
Post: #2
RE: Garrett Farm
First, welcome to the forum "Mom," and may I say that your daughter's name is lovely and very old-fashioned - such a pleasant change from our modern "selections."

I'm not sure how to answer your question because I'm not sure what "offered transportation" you are referring to. Upon leaving the ferry at Port Royal, they were sharing horse backs with two of the three returning Confederates. When Mr. Garrett agreed to take them in, only Booth remained the first night. Herold actually went on with the soldiers and returned the next day.

From that point on, I don't remember anyone offering them transportation. Their strange behavior caused the Garretts to ask them to leave, but no offer of transportation was made. In fact, they were banished to the barn and the door was locked without their knowledge because the family feared that they would steal their horses in the dark of night.
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08-27-2013, 08:15 AM
Post: #3
RE: Garrett Farm
Be careful- the study of the Lincoln assassination can be addicting!

Bill Nash
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08-27-2013, 08:34 AM (This post was last modified: 08-27-2013 08:35 AM by hannahrozesmom.)
Post: #4
RE: Garrett Farm
(08-27-2013 08:01 AM)L Verge Wrote:  First, welcome to the forum "Mom," and may I say that your daughter's name is lovely and very old-fashioned - such a pleasant change from our modern "selections."

I'm not sure how to answer your question because I'm not sure what "offered transportation" you are referring to. Upon leaving the ferry at Port Royal, they were sharing horse backs with two of the three returning Confederates. When Mr. Garrett agreed to take them in, only Booth remained the first night. Herold actually went on with the soldiers and returned the next day.

From that point on, I don't remember anyone offering them transportation. Their strange behavior caused the Garretts to ask them to leave, but no offer of transportation was made. In fact, they were banished to the barn and the door was locked without their knowledge because the family feared that they would steal their horses in the dark of night.

Thank you for your prompt response. I am listening to James Swanson's Manhunt The 12-Day Hunt For Lincoln's Killer and it states that Mr. Garrett's son had offered to take them by wagon pretty much anywhere they wanted to go just to get rid of them earlier in the day? I wonder why they did not choose to leave?

(08-27-2013 08:15 AM)LincolnMan Wrote:  Be careful- the study of the Lincoln assassination can be addicting!

I know I am already hooked! So much to learn and so many questions. Glad I found this forum Smile
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08-27-2013, 11:21 AM
Post: #5
RE: Garrett Farm
My apologies. I am going to have refresh my reading because I really don't remember an offer of that kind from the Garrett son. Dave Taylor is our Garrett family expert - Dave, where art thou?
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08-27-2013, 08:15 PM
Post: #6
RE: Garrett Farm
Maybe they both needed to rest-or at least Booth- because of his leg?

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08-27-2013, 08:23 PM (This post was last modified: 08-27-2013 08:24 PM by Rob Wick.)
Post: #7
RE: Garrett Farm
I've always thought that Booth had pretty well played himself out physically as well as emotionally. Even though the Garrett's didn't know who he was, they were enthralled with him, especially the women and the children. Booth was once more the actor on stage and was playing it for all it was worth. Look at how he had been treated up to that point. He was run off properties, refused basic necessities or given them so grudgingly that he resented it (hence the note to Dr. Stuart). Here at the Garrett's home, he had some of the kindness and support that he so far had not received. Indeed, I think if he had only stayed with the Garrett's for a few hours and kept moving on, he still might have evaded capture for a few days or even longer. Wanting to hold on to that feeling is part of what doomed him.

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Rob

Abraham Lincoln in the only man, dead or alive, with whom I could have spent five years without one hour of boredom.
--Ida M. Tarbell
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08-27-2013, 08:45 PM
Post: #8
RE: Garrett Farm
(08-27-2013 08:23 PM)Rob Wick Wrote:  I've always thought that Booth had pretty well played himself out physically as well as emotionally. Even though the Garrett's didn't know who he was, they were enthralled with him, especially the women and the children. Booth was once more the actor on stage and was playing it for all it was worth. Look at how he had been treated up to that point. He was run off properties, refused basic necessities or given them so grudgingly that he resented it (hence the note to Dr. Stuart). Here at the Garrett's home, he had some of the kindness and support that he so far had not received. Indeed, I think if he had only stayed with the Garrett's for a few hours and kept moving on, he still might have evaded capture for a few days or even longer. Wanting to hold on to that feeling is part of what doomed him.

Best
Rob

Yes Rob I could see that....I guess I would think that after reading the newspapers that he was the most wanted man in America that he would have kept moving deeper south as quickly as possible. In fact they had came very close to capture twice that day when the calvary rode by and the warning from the 2 Confederate soliders why they would stay like sitting ducks. Was Booth's ego that big?
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08-27-2013, 08:53 PM (This post was last modified: 08-27-2013 08:53 PM by Rob Wick.)
Post: #9
RE: Garrett Farm
Quote:Yes Rob I could see that....I guess I would think that after reading the newspapers that he was the most wanted man in America that he would have kept moving deeper south as quickly as possible. In fact they had came very close to capture twice that day when the calvary rode by and the warning from the 2 Confederate soliders why they would stay like sitting ducks. Was Booth's ego that big?

Short answer. Yes.

You have to remember, however, that after the cavalry rode by, Booth and Herold ran into the woods, which caused the Garretts to become suspicious. At that point, they wanted out of there but had no means of transportation. The Garretts wouldn't sell Booth a horse but still wanted him out of there. That's what led to them locking Booth and Herold in the tobacco barn--fear they would steal their horses.

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Rob

Abraham Lincoln in the only man, dead or alive, with whom I could have spent five years without one hour of boredom.
--Ida M. Tarbell
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08-28-2013, 07:58 AM
Post: #10
RE: Garrett Farm
I have not checked the printed version of Manhunt, but I have checked the authoritative works of both Kauffman and Steers trying to verify the statement that the Garretts offered to transport the fugitives somewhere. That is not mentioned in either book, nor do I ever remember James O. Hall, Mike Kauffman, Bob Allen, or John Howard (our bus tour narrators over the years) ever saying it.

As Rob stated above, the Garretts became very wary of the pair after their actions when the cavalry rode past the farm. Booth and Herold were told to move along, but won a brief stay outside of the house for the night. And we know what happened then.

I also question as to whether the Garretts even had a wagon to offer. When Booth's body needed transportation back to the John S. Ide, the cavalry commandeered a dilapidated wagon from Ned Freeman, a free black neighbor of the Garretts, and hired the man to drive it. If the Garretts had a wagon, why wouldn't the Feds just take it?
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08-28-2013, 07:58 AM (This post was last modified: 08-28-2013 10:25 AM by Eva Elisabeth.)
Post: #11
RE: Garrett Farm
(08-27-2013 08:15 PM)LincolnMan Wrote:  Maybe they both needed to rest-or at least Booth- because of his leg?
After Dr. Mudd's treatment - did JWB mention and complain about pain in his leg again?

(08-27-2013 08:53 PM)Rob Wick Wrote:  The Garretts wouldn't sell Booth a horse.
Would JWB have had enough money with him? For how long did he plan/ was he (financially) equipped for his escape?
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08-28-2013, 10:16 AM
Post: #12
RE: Garrett Farm
If I remember correctly, Booth had not only the Canadian bank notes on him (3), but also $45 in greenbacks.

If you are referring to Dr. Mudd's treatment, I believe that Thomas Jones made a comment about Booth's pain being evident and so did either Ruggles or Bainbridge later after accompanying the fugitives on the ferry.
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08-28-2013, 10:28 AM (This post was last modified: 08-28-2013 10:37 AM by Eva Elisabeth.)
Post: #13
RE: Garrett Farm
Sorry, Laurie, I didn't re-read my post after writing it, and sometimes the autocorrection plays a trick on me. Yes, it was intented to read Dr Mudd. Thanks for your reply!
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08-28-2013, 01:52 PM (This post was last modified: 08-28-2013 01:53 PM by hannahrozesmom.)
Post: #14
RE: Garrett Farm
(08-28-2013 07:58 AM)L Verge Wrote:  I have not checked the printed version of Manhunt, but I have checked the authoritative works of both Kauffman and Steers trying to verify the statement that the Garretts offered to transport the fugitives somewhere. That is not mentioned in either book, nor do I ever remember James O. Hall, Mike Kauffman, Bob Allen, or John Howard (our bus tour narrators over the years) ever saying it.

As Rob stated above, the Garretts became very wary of the pair after their actions when the cavalry rode past the farm. Booth and Herold were told to move along, but won a brief stay outside of the house for the night. And we know what happened then.

I also question as to whether the Garretts even had a wagon to offer. When Booth's body needed transportation back to the John S. Ide, the cavalry commandeered a dilapidated wagon from Ned Freeman, a free black neighbor of the Garretts, and hired the man to drive it. If the Garretts had a wagon, why wouldn't the Feds just take it?
I am not sure of what source Mr. Swanson is quoting about the Garrett son telling them he would take them if they would just leave. I have listened to the CD several times to make sure I heard correctly and it does say that. I had read from another source that the Garrett's tried to spin themselves in a better light after Booth's death. Perhaps that is where the quote came from? Trying to take blame off of themselves? Just a thought?

(08-27-2013 08:01 AM)L Verge Wrote:  First, welcome to the forum "Mom," and may I say that your daughter's name is lovely and very old-fashioned - such a pleasant change from our modern "selections."

I'm not sure how to answer your question because I'm not sure what "offered transportation" you are referring to. Upon leaving the ferry at Port Royal, they were sharing horse backs with two of the three returning Confederates. When Mr. Garrett agreed to take them in, only Booth remained the first night. Herold actually went on with the soldiers and returned the next day.

From that point on, I don't remember anyone offering them transportation. Their strange behavior caused the Garretts to ask them to leave, but no offer of transportation was made. In fact, they were banished to the barn and the door was locked without their knowledge because the family feared that they would steal their horses in the dark of night.

Thank you! My daughter is named after my grandmother :-) I love the old fashioned names too!
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08-28-2013, 03:09 PM
Post: #15
RE: Garrett Farm
If I can find the time, I will try to check trial transcripts or statements that the Garretts might have made that Jim picked up on when other authors didn't. In the meantime, I'm still hoping Dave Taylor will chime in on this. He's a teacher, however, going through week #1 of the new year...
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