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Gravesite inspiration welcome
07-26-2022, 08:05 AM
Post: #1
Gravesite inspiration welcome
A few days ago, I was invited to an online video casting for "Who wants to be a millionaire", the only TV show I love to watch due to my trivia addiction.

Of course, they prefer candidates that have some stories to tell or weird hobbies, which I obviously offer.
Amongst other, they were interested in my interest in Lincoln, the assassination, and the Rathbone- gravesearch- story. Like 99% of all Germans, they found it weird to search and visit gravesites of historical individuals at all. I was asked why people/I would do this. I replied that I first got in touch with this free time activity when I joined the forum, and that I came to find it fascinating because it means to "meet" those historical individuals "in person" (not just their properties or belongings), and that it helps to realize the past really happened, these individuals really lived, and that all isn't just a fairly tale.

Maybe forum members (= you) can express this better or add reasons I am unaware of?! So -

- Why are you searching and visiting "historical" gravesites?
- What sites have you already seen, and which is your favorite? (Why?)
- What sites are still on your bucket list (and why?)?

Any input and inspiration on this is most welcome and appreciated!!
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07-26-2022, 11:01 AM
Post: #2
RE: Gravesite inspiration welcome
For me I think it's the grave of Lewis Powell in Geneva, Florida. The story of what happened with his remains is so convoluted that it made me want to visit his gravesite. I know this seems pretty weird, but I am just being honest.

[Image: lewispowell2001.jpg]
Photo taken by Eva when she visited Florida in 2014
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07-26-2022, 12:23 PM
Post: #3
RE: Gravesite inspiration welcome
Part of the interest in visiting grave sites for me is to pay my respects to people who were a part of history and contributed to making this a great country to live in.
Growing up in a small town in New Hampshire I can remember taking a family walk in the woods and coming across an old neglected cemetery with headstones dating back to the 1800's and even 1700's. We would call out the inscriptions on the headstones to each other, trying to find the oldest and most interesting ones. Fascinating and spooky at the same time. These were people who had lived not far from my home. Some who's homes were still standing and being lived in, the school bus passed by their homes everyday. History was all around us (or seemed to be) The church we had attended was a previous 200 year old, two story, brick schoolhouse.
https://www.google.com/maps/place/867+La...70.8705471

Thanks Eva, I haven't thought about this in a long time.

So when is this "Old Enough To Know Better" supposed to kick in?
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07-26-2022, 12:31 PM (This post was last modified: 07-26-2022 12:32 PM by Susan Higginbotham.)
Post: #4
RE: Gravesite inspiration welcome
I've loved going to cemeteries and gravesites since I was in my teens. As relates to this site, I've seen Lincoln's tomb, Robert Lincoln's grave at Arlington Cemetery, the Todd family graves in Lexington, KY, the Surratt family graves in D.C. and John Jr.'s grave in Baltimore, and those of the Booth family in Baltimore. I was in Springfield, IL, without a car and arrived at the cemetery near closing time, so I didn't have nearly enough time to explore it as I wanted to. I'd like to go back and spend more time at the Lincoln tomb and see the graves of others in Springfield connected with the Lincolns.

On my bucket list are those of John Brown's widow and children in California and that of the feminist Ernestine Rose in Highgate Cemetery in London. They are people I've researched and aside from my love for cemeteries, I like to visit places associated with people I research, including their final resting places.
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07-26-2022, 09:52 PM (This post was last modified: 07-26-2022 10:13 PM by Eva Elisabeth.)
Post: #5
RE: Gravesite inspiration welcome
Thank you, Roger, Gene and Susan for your wonderful replies and shared thoughts!
Roger - thank you for posting that photo - I feel the same, but despite I just found this one of the most peaceful, idyllic spots I have seen in the world. Lewis was so to speak lucky at least as to his resting place.

(07-26-2022 12:23 PM)Gene C Wrote:  Part of the interest in visiting grave sites for me is to pay my respects to people who were a part of history and contributed to making this a great country to live in.
Growing up in a small town in New Hampshire I can remember taking a family walk in the woods and coming across an old neglected cemetery with headstones dating back to the 1800's and even 1700's. We would call out the inscriptions on the headstones to each other, trying to find the oldest and most interesting ones. Fascinating and spooky at the same time. These were people who had lived not far from my home. Some who's homes were still standing and being lived in, the school bus passed by their homes everyday. History was all around us (or seemed to be) The church we had attended was a previous 200 year old, two story, brick schoolhouse.
https://www.google.com/maps/place/867+La...70.8705471

Thanks Eva, I haven't thought about this in a long time.

That are fascinating memories, Gene, and you added a good point and reason, thank you for sharing!

(07-26-2022 12:31 PM)Susan Higginbotham Wrote:  I've loved going to cemeteries and gravesites since I was in my teens. As relates to this site, I've seen Lincoln's tomb, Robert Lincoln's grave at Arlington Cemetery, the Todd family graves in Lexington, KY, the Surratt family graves in D.C. and John Jr.'s grave in Baltimore, and those of the Booth family in Baltimore. I was in Springfield, IL, without a car and arrived at the cemetery near closing time, so I didn't have nearly enough time to explore it as I wanted to. I'd like to go back and spend more time at the Lincoln tomb and see the graves of others in Springfield connected with the Lincolns.

On my bucket list are those of John Brown's widow and children in California and that of the feminist Ernestine Rose in Highgate Cemetery in London. They are people I've researched and aside from my love for cemeteries, I like to visit places associated with people I research, including their final resting places.
That is cool, Susan - I have only seen Robert's grave in Arlington (and the Kennedys' subsequently). In Europe, I would like to visit Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris as so many VIPs RIP there, among others Judah Benjamin. Another site in EU is in Bonn, Germany, where Princess Salm-Salm rests. One Lincoln-saga-related gravesite I have visited here is this (and I think this is about it in EU):
http://deadconjurers.blogspot.com/2011/0...e.html?m=1
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07-27-2022, 09:36 PM
Post: #6
RE: Gravesite inspiration welcome
(07-26-2022 09:52 PM)Eva Elisabeth Wrote:  Thank you, Roger, Gene and Susan for your wonderful replies and shared thoughts!
Roger - thank you for posting that photo - I feel the same, but despite I just found this one of the most peaceful, idyllic spots I have seen in the world. Lewis was so to speak lucky at least as to his resting place.

(07-26-2022 12:23 PM)Gene C Wrote:  Part of the interest in visiting grave sites for me is to pay my respects to people who were a part of history and contributed to making this a great country to live in.
Growing up in a small town in New Hampshire I can remember taking a family walk in the woods and coming across an old neglected cemetery with headstones dating back to the 1800's and even 1700's. We would call out the inscriptions on the headstones to each other, trying to find the oldest and most interesting ones. Fascinating and spooky at the same time. These were people who had lived not far from my home. Some who's homes were still standing and being lived in, the school bus passed by their homes everyday. History was all around us (or seemed to be) The church we had attended was a previous 200 year old, two story, brick schoolhouse.
https://www.google.com/maps/place/867+La...70.8705471

Thanks Eva, I haven't thought about this in a long time.

That are fascinating memories, Gene, and you added a good point and reason, thank you for sharing!

(07-26-2022 12:31 PM)Susan Higginbotham Wrote:  I've loved going to cemeteries and gravesites since I was in my teens. As relates to this site, I've seen Lincoln's tomb, Robert Lincoln's grave at Arlington Cemetery, the Todd family graves in Lexington, KY, the Surratt family graves in D.C. and John Jr.'s grave in Baltimore, and those of the Booth family in Baltimore. I was in Springfield, IL, without a car and arrived at the cemetery near closing time, so I didn't have nearly enough time to explore it as I wanted to. I'd like to go back and spend more time at the Lincoln tomb and see the graves of others in Springfield connected with the Lincolns.

On my bucket list are those of John Brown's widow and children in California and that of the feminist Ernestine Rose in Highgate Cemetery in London. They are people I've researched and aside from my love for cemeteries, I like to visit places associated with people I research, including their final resting places.
That is cool, Susan - I have only seen Robert's grave in Arlington (and the Kennedys' subsequently). In Europe, I would like to visit Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris as so many VIPs RIP there, among others Judah Benjamin. Another site in EU is in Bonn, Germany, where Princess Salm-Salm rests. One Lincoln-saga-related gravesite I have visited here is this (and I think this is about it in EU):
http://deadconjurers.blogspot.com/2011/0...e.html?m=1
I would love to get back to Germany one day. I haven't been since I was a teenager, and that was a long time ago. Will have to remember to look up the princess if I do!
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07-28-2022, 09:07 AM
Post: #7
RE: Gravesite inspiration welcome
I visited the Pere Lachaise Cemetery during a visit to Paris in 2003. Unfortunately, back then, I knew nothing of the history about Judah Benjamin. Jim Morrison of the singing group, "The Doors", is also buried there. I have also heard that the singer, Cher, would like to be buried there someday. One requirement for that is to be a resident of Paris for a certain amount of time.
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07-29-2022, 07:53 AM
Post: #8
RE: Gravesite inspiration welcome
People living within 5 kilometres of the centre of Paris cannot be buried in Pere Lachaise Cemetery.

“The honest man, tho' e'er sae poor,
Is king o' men for a' that” Robert Burns
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07-29-2022, 08:53 AM (This post was last modified: 07-29-2022 08:55 AM by Eva Elisabeth.)
Post: #9
RE: Gravesite inspiration welcome
(07-28-2022 09:07 AM)Rogerm Wrote:  I visited the Pere Lachaise Cemetery during a visit to Paris in 2003. Unfortunately, back then, I knew nothing of the history about Judah Benjamin. Jim Morrison of the singing group, "The Doors", is also buried there. I have also heard that the singer, Cher, would like to be buried there someday. One requirement for that is to be a resident of Paris for a certain amount of time.
Sarah Bernard rests there, too, and so many others. Jim Morrison's is one gravesite that would be on my bucket list there, too!

Any other grave hunters and bucket lists out there?
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07-29-2022, 05:49 PM (This post was last modified: 07-29-2022 05:50 PM by AussieMick.)
Post: #10
RE: Gravesite inspiration welcome
(07-29-2022 07:53 AM)AussieMick Wrote:  People living within 5 kilometres of the centre of Paris cannot be buried in Pere Lachaise Cemetery.

ummm ... that was an attempt at humour ... a Dad's joke ... (its illegal to bury live people, no matter where they are living) ... anyway, moving on.

(07-29-2022 08:53 AM)Eva Elisabeth Wrote:  
(07-28-2022 09:07 AM)Rogerm Wrote:  I visited the Pere Lachaise Cemetery during a visit to Paris in 2003. Unfortunately, back then, I knew nothing of the history about Judah Benjamin. Jim Morrison of the singing group, "The Doors", is also buried there. I have also heard that the singer, Cher, would like to be buried there someday. One requirement for that is to be a resident of Paris for a certain amount of time.
Sarah Bernard rests there, too, and so many others. Jim Morrison's is one gravesite that would be on my bucket list there, too!

Any other grave hunters and bucket lists out there?

Oscar Wilde and Chopin are also buried at the cemetery.

“The honest man, tho' e'er sae poor,
Is king o' men for a' that” Robert Burns
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07-29-2022, 09:57 PM (This post was last modified: 07-29-2022 10:30 PM by J. Beckert.)
Post: #11
RE: Gravesite inspiration welcome
I find it fascinating to "meet" historical people as well, Eva. Whenever I'm in that part of Vermont, I always find it an honor to be within 6' of President Coolidge. His humble gravestone only lists his date of birth and the date of his death. The only hint he was a little something more is the Presidential Seal at the top of his stone.
I missed meeting his son by minutes in 1995 at The Plymouth Cheese Factory that he owned and ran. It would have been a thrill to shake the hand of someone that had touched a historical figure, even if it was decades ago, with that same hand. It was also a thrill to run my hand up the same banister that Booth held at Mudd's house.


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07-29-2022, 11:26 PM (This post was last modified: 07-29-2022 11:37 PM by Eva Elisabeth.)
Post: #12
RE: Gravesite inspiration welcome
(07-29-2022 05:49 PM)AussieMick Wrote:  
(07-29-2022 07:53 AM)AussieMick Wrote:  People living within 5 kilometres of the centre of Paris cannot be buried in Pere Lachaise Cemetery.

ummm ... that was an attempt at humour ... a Dad's joke ... (its illegal to bury live people, no matter where they are living) ... anyway, moving on.
Touché!

(07-29-2022 09:57 PM)J. Beckert Wrote:  I find it fascinating to "meet" historical people as well, Eva. Whenever I'm in that part of Vermont, I always find it an honor to be within 6' of President Coolidge. His humble gravestone only lists his date of birth and the date of his death. The only hint he was a little something more is the Presidential Seal at the top of his stone.
I missed meeting his son by minutes in 1995 at The Plymouth Cheese Factory that he owned and ran. It would have been a thrill to shake the hand of someone that had touched a historical figure, even if it was decades ago, with that same hand. It was also a thrill to run my hand up the same banister that Booth held at Mudd's house.
Thank you, Joe, for sharing these thoughts - yes, I, too, (would) find it thrilling to touch someone or even something that had touched a historical figure - you expressed that very well!! I will never forget when Blaine let me hold Mary' s veil, and I cherish a twig of the Mosby tree! (I remember you behaved quote touchy at Hildene, didn't you?) Thank you also for sharing Pres. Coolidge's gravestone - that is indeed a humble one! I wonder if it was his explicit wish (which would speak for him!)?
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07-30-2022, 05:09 AM
Post: #13
RE: Gravesite inspiration welcome
(11-14-2012 05:16 PM)Rsmyth Wrote:  Joe, you touched the sofa that Fido slept on? Amazing!

(07-29-2022 11:26 PM)Eva Elisabeth Wrote:  (I remember you behaved quote touchy at Hildene, didn't you?)

Joe, I remember when you were at Hildene you touched a sofa when the tour guide wasn't looking. The sofa was originally in the Lincoln Home in Springfield. I agree with Rich - amazing!
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Yesterday, 08:09 PM
Post: #14
RE: Gravesite inspiration welcome
YouTube channel Hollywood Graveyard by Arthur Dark visits Lincoln's tomb which I found quite fascinating as I have only seen photographs of it.

It's about 15 minutes into the video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFIBwOSn...dGraveyard

The picture of Lincoln in his coffin seems to be taken from an illustration by artist Ray Downing.
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