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Abraham Lincoln statues
11-25-2022, 12:13 PM
Post: #106
RE: Abraham Lincoln statues
I thought that I would add information regarding the Lincoln sittings at the White House in Edward S. Cooper's book Vinnie Ream, An American Sculptor at pages 18-19:

The president gave orders that he was not to be disturbed during the sittings and Vinnie could recall their being interrupted only twice. The fist visitor was a woman of middle age. She was the mother of a boy who had worn the gray and who had been captured and was in old Capitol prison. To visit her boy, she needed a pass with the president's signature. He listened "graciously" to her story, Vinnie remembered, wrote a pass himself and apologized for the boy's situation. On the second occasion, a young pretty woman came in, blushing and stammering over her request. The president anticipated her and granted her wish, saying afterward that he could tell from her blushes that she wanted to visit her sweetheart. (Source: Vinnie Ream interview, Washington Sunday Star, Feb. 9, 1913.)

"So very difficult a matter is it to trace and find out the truth of anything by history." -- Plutarch
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11-25-2022, 01:23 PM
Post: #107
RE: Abraham Lincoln statues
Tom Bogar post #7 of Gene's thread titled "Vinnie Ream - An American Sculptor" (the book) reads in part:

I have no doubt, for instance, that Mary Lincoln had no idea that Vinnie was in her husband's office as he worked, making sketches for her model of his statue. But, bottom line: if you can get a good used copy, snag it and enjoy an intriguing life story.

"So very difficult a matter is it to trace and find out the truth of anything by history." -- Plutarch
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11-25-2022, 07:43 PM
Post: #108
RE: Abraham Lincoln statues
(11-18-2022 12:00 PM)David Lockmiller Wrote:  There is no reference to Vinnie Ream in Professor Burlingame's book Abraham Lincoln: A Life, Vol. 2.

David, do you know why Professor Burlingame did not mention her?
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11-26-2022, 01:41 AM
Post: #109
RE: Abraham Lincoln statues
(11-25-2022 07:43 PM)RJNorton Wrote:  
(11-18-2022 12:00 PM)David Lockmiller Wrote:  There is no reference to Vinnie Ream in Professor Burlingame's book Abraham Lincoln: A Life, Vol. 2.

David, do you know why Professor Burlingame did not mention her?

Roger, I tried to find any reference to Vinnie Ream in the unabridged Abraham Lincoln: A Life on the Knox College website but I was unable to find a reference to her. The online posting of the two volumes has no index to search alphabetically.

Any reference to her would have been in Chapter 35 which covers the period Nov. 1864 - April 1865 (She had a five month relationship with the last meeting on the day President Lincoln was executed. I looked through the chapter pretty thoroughly but was unable to find any reference to her (but it was an eventful time including passage of the Thirteenth Amendment legislation, the appointment of Chase as Chief Justice, and the approaching end of the Civil War).

But I did find this passage in Vinnie Ream book at page 22:

The Lincoln bust was nearing completion: just a few more sittings were scheduled when the president left Washington on March 23, 1865, to meet General Grant at City Point to discuss postwar plans and possible surrender terms. Lincoln returned on the evening of April 9. . . . On Friday, April 14, the president, who had been busy, but happier than Vinnie had ever seen him, went to Ford's Theater to see Our American Cousin, starring Laura Keene.

Vinnie was home alone that evening. Around midnight, as her parents were entering the house, someone hurrying past called out that Lincoln had been shot. Vinnie was stricken, and later described some of her emotions during the five months the president had set for her: "Throughout all this time the personality of Lincoln was gradually sinking deeper and deeper into my soul. I was modeling the man in clay, but he was being engraven still more deeply upon my heart . . . . A big, strong man broken by grief is always a tragic thing to see, but never was there a grief equal to Lincoln's . . . . [He] would have a far-away dreamy look and his eyes would light up and his whole face would be illuminated . . . ." (Washington Sunday Star, Feb. 9, 1913, interview with VR.)

"So very difficult a matter is it to trace and find out the truth of anything by history." -- Plutarch
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