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Stump the German
09-30-2019, 07:25 AM (This post was last modified: 09-30-2019 07:26 AM by AussieMick.)
Post: #481
RE: Stump the German
Eva, Google is so helpful ... its throwing so much information. Antoni Gaudi is the architect that seems to be the best guess for me. 7 heritage sites.

Australia needs more people (thats my political view ... not well supported) ... the bigger the genetic mix the better.

“The honest man, tho' e'er sae poor,
Is king o' men for a' that” Robert Burns
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09-30-2019, 07:30 AM
Post: #482
RE: Stump the German
Brilliant, correct. Now, can you guess which site?
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09-30-2019, 06:37 PM
Post: #483
RE: Stump the German
Park Guell?

“The honest man, tho' e'er sae poor,
Is king o' men for a' that” Robert Burns
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09-30-2019, 07:06 PM (This post was last modified: 09-30-2019 07:07 PM by Eva Elisabeth.)
Post: #484
RE: Stump the German
Brilliant, Mick (sorry for delay, finally arrived after 745 miles on the road, through three EU capitals, and lots of stuff to unpack...) - the salamander, popularly known as "el drac" (the dragon), is located in Park Güell.

The park, built from 1900 to 1914, was commissioned by Count Eusebi Güell, whose fortune was made by his father from US slave trade. Güell assigned the design to Antoni Gaudí, who unleashed all his architectonic genius - innovative structural solutions inspired from organic shapes. So fascinating, and what a visionary Gaudí was, also in matters of sustainability! His inspiration seems to have been endless - I just can give an exemplary glimpse thereof - one cool element in the park is the serpentine bench which surrounds the main terrace (intended for theater performances etc., with a gorgeous view over the city and the Mediterranean Sea). The unique shape enables the people sitting on it to converse privately, although the square is large. The bench is tiled with broken bits that a nearby factory disposed of (sustainability...), small holes helped to dry up quickly after rainfall, and to stop people from sitting in the wet part of the bench, small bumps were installed by Gaudí. To make sitting as comfortable as possible, Gaudí ordered his workers sit as comfortable as possible on the pre-cast concrete to get the perfect shape of the seat.
   
Gaudí's genius culminated in the creation of the famous Basilica Sagrada Familia (Cathedral of the Holy Family). He wanted it to look like a sand castle made by children, and it does. Three facades shall tell different aspects from the Bible and Jesus' life - the Facades of Nativity, Suffering and Salvation - endless details to discover, fascinating. Moreover inside - you feel like in a colorful forest, the columns vanishing in heaven, branching out like trees.
   
Sadly Gaudí was run over by a streetcar before he could finish his masterpiece. It is still under construction, strictly following his drafts and cast models, supposed to be finished in 2026. Well, still quick for a cathedral, the Cologne Cathedral needed 632 years and 2 months to get ready...

The "Works of Antoni Gaudí'" have long been declared UNESCO World Heritage. Go here for some colorful impressions, I promise you have never seen anything like that:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=B2WV71dgrTs

Laurie and Mick - you win a slave trade history tour in Barcelona:
https://amp-theguardian-com.cdn.ampproje...in-ramblas
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07-06-2020, 04:40 PM
Post: #485
RE: Stump the German
I post this question here because a quizz in an Austrian puzzle book I got as a small gift for my mother inspired me to ask - who is (was) this gentleman? No Google image search svp.!
   
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07-07-2020, 03:58 AM
Post: #486
RE: Stump the German
Is he a figure in American history?
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07-07-2020, 08:06 AM (This post was last modified: 07-07-2020 08:06 AM by Eva Elisabeth.)
Post: #487
RE: Stump the German
He played an important role in Lincoln's CV and in an important event that influenced Lincoln's "strive for success" respectively his goals.
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07-07-2020, 09:17 AM
Post: #488
RE: Stump the German
Does he enter the Lincoln saga after the New Salem years? Could it be a young Ninian Edwards?
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07-07-2020, 05:48 PM (This post was last modified: 07-07-2020 05:49 PM by Eva Elisabeth.)
Post: #489
RE: Stump the German
Good guess, Roger - yes, he entered the saga during Lincoln's Springfield years, but it's not Ninian Edwards.

Hint #1: It has to do with a law case.
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07-07-2020, 10:34 PM
Post: #490
RE: Stump the German
Is this Jack Armstrong, a man Lincoln once wrestled, and whose son, I believe, he defended successfully in a murder case?
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07-08-2020, 03:29 PM
Post: #491
RE: Stump the German
Sorry for delay - another good guess Roger, but not correct. It's not easy to give hints on this one that don't instantly reveal the identity.

Hint #2: The case respectively circumstances got Lincoln "thinking" - got him some new insights for his career.
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07-08-2020, 03:53 PM
Post: #492
RE: Stump the German
If it was a prominent legal case, it would either be the Alton Railroad case, the Peachy Harrison murder trial, or the Reaper trial. Is that a correct assumption?

Best
Rob

Abraham Lincoln in the only man, dead or alive, with whom I could have spent five years without one hour of boredom.
--Ida M. Tarbell

I want the respect of intelligent men, but I will choose for myself the intelligent.
--Carl Sandburg
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07-08-2020, 04:07 PM
Post: #493
RE: Stump the German
(07-08-2020 03:53 PM)Rob Wick Wrote:  If it was a prominent legal case, it would either be the Alton Railroad case, the Peachy Harrison murder trial, or the Reaper trial. Is that a correct assumption?

Best
Rob
Yes - correct and very smart, Rob. So, whose likeness does the image show?
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07-08-2020, 04:49 PM
Post: #494
RE: Stump the German
My first guess was Harrison, but I couldn't find a picture of him on the web. Second, there was no picture of James Barrett, whom the Alton railroad sued. So finally, I looked up the Reaper trial and came across the picture of John Henry Manny, whom Cyrus McCormick sued for patent infringement. So my guess is Manny.

Best
Rob

Abraham Lincoln in the only man, dead or alive, with whom I could have spent five years without one hour of boredom.
--Ida M. Tarbell

I want the respect of intelligent men, but I will choose for myself the intelligent.
--Carl Sandburg
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07-08-2020, 05:07 PM (This post was last modified: 07-08-2020 05:09 PM by Eva Elisabeth.)
Post: #495
RE: Stump the German
Well done, Rob! I came upon this question because a quizz question in an Austrian puzzle book asked who invented the reaper, and the answer was a Scottish minister in 1826. I, of course thought it referred to McCormick and the authors got the year wrong, also I had never read McCormick was a minister. So I checked it out and found that indeed a Scottish minister named Patrick Bell invented the very first reaper but didn't care about a patent. And obviously McCormick also wanted Bell "out of the race":
https://www.scientificamerican.com/artic...852-11-13/
Here's a photo of Bell's 1826 reaper:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bobloveloc...hotostream
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