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RE: Abraham Lincoln statues - David Lockmiller - 01-22-2021 10:54 AM

(12-30-2020 09:30 AM)David Lockmiller Wrote:  
(12-29-2020 08:23 PM)David Lockmiller Wrote:  A statue of Abraham Lincoln was vandalized in San Francisco as a school district committee pushes for the renaming of Lincoln High School and others, authorities said.

Deputies responded to a call about the incident at 12:55 p.m. Saturday, the San Francisco Sheriff’s Department told McClatchy News in an email. The suspect had fled before deputies arrived, according to the department.

The statue has been restored and deputies are still investigating.

Lincoln statue vandalized amid calls to rename namesake school, California cops say - Sacramento Bee by BROOKE WOLFORD, DECEMBER 28, 2020

The following story was posted online on Sunday, December 27, 2020 [the day after the damage to the Lincoln statue] by Christopher Beale, a journalist based in San Francisco, who is mentioned in the Sacramento Bee story referred to above. The reporter seems to have been well-prepared to do this "unexpected" story. He also took photographs of the damage done to the Lincoln statue for the article. It does seem a little odd that he just happened to be walking by San Francisco City Hall on the Sunday morning following the damage done to the Lincoln statue around noon on the previous day.

Abraham Lincoln’s Bloody Statue & Legacy
Christopher J. Beale
Dec 27, 2020

The article's first paragraph reads as follows:

"I was walking by City Hall Sunday morning when I saw it — the statue of the 16th president, Abraham Lincoln had its face painted red. The letters of his last name were also painted red. As of yet, we don’t know who vandalized the statue, but history may give us a clue as to why."

The Sacramento Bee article also had a copy of a relevant Tweet Christopher Beale had made on December 27 which reads as follows:

"Why is Lincoln in #SanFrancisco 'bloody' today?

It has to do with his role in the largest mass execution in US history. A story that we were not taught in school."

For a reporter, Christopher Beale seems to be very opinionated regarding the role of President Abraham Lincoln in the "Dakota 38" controversy, but not very knowledgeable.


RE: Abraham Lincoln statues - Jim Garrett - 01-26-2021 10:06 AM

So what have we learned from looking at the 19th century through 20th century eyes? All of our heroes during this time period were horrible people. The people who shaped our country were mostly white supremacists who took advantage of all other ethnicities regardless of the cost. The reality is that they lived in an entirely different world. To condemn Lincoln as a racist is to give him 21st century attributes. This is similar to the old SNL skit of what if Custer had a B-52 at the Little Big Horn.

Unfortunately, we have way too many arm chair historians with no understanding of history. A good question to ask is how our current society, leaders, social movements, etc. be viewed by "historians" 150 years in the future.


RE: Abraham Lincoln statues - David Lockmiller - 01-26-2021 04:25 PM

Yesterday, I wrote the following email to every member of the San Francisco Board of Education with a copy to Professor Burlingame and Heather Knight, of the San Francisco Chronicle.

The Subject Line of my email reads: Related subjects of the “Dakota 38” and the recommended renaming of Abraham Lincoln High School.

Professor Michael Burlingame was the winner of the 2010 Lincoln Prize for his two-volume work on Lincoln, titled “Abraham Lincoln: A Life.” Professor Burlingame devoted five pages of his scholarly work to the 1862 Dakota Sioux Indian uprising and the subsequent actions taken by President Lincoln, titled “Magnanimity: Dealing the Minnesota Sioux Uprising.” (“Abraham Lincoln: A Life,” Vol. Two, pages 480-84.)

At my urgent request, Professor Burlingame provided to me on Sunday, January24, 2021 an abbreviated version of this same work to present for review by the elected members of the San Francisco School Board and others. Professor Burlingame graciously wrote at the top of his email to me: “I hope this fills the bill. Please forward it to the relevant parties.”

Abraham Lincoln Overrules Death Sentence for
264 Dakota Indians Convicted of Murder or Rape
by Michael Burlingame

In the summer of 1862, Dakota Indians in Minnesota, understandably angry at white encroachment on their territory, at the government’s failure to deliver promised supplies and money, and at the notorious corruption of Indian agents and traders, attacked white men, women, and children along the frontier, killing hundreds and driving over 30,000 from their homes. It was the bloodiest massacre of civilians on U.S. soil prior to September 11, 2001.

After U.S. Army forces under General John Pope put down the rebellion, a military court condemned 303 Dakotas to death. Faced with a potential mass execution, Abraham Lincoln “resolved that such an outrage, as the indiscriminate hanging of these Indians most certainly would be, shall not take place,” according to a Washington newspaper widely regarded as an administration organ. When the president ordered the suspension of the sentences and demanded to see “the full and complete record of these convictions,” General Pope reported that white Minnesotans “are exasperated to the last degree.” The “most horrible massacres have been committed; children nailed alive to trees, women violated and then disemboweled – everything that horrible ingenuity could devise.” Therefore, the general warned, “if the guilty are not all executed I think it nearly impossible to prevent the indiscriminate massacre of all the Indians – old men, women, and children.”

Echoing that advice, Minnesota congressman Cyrus Aldrich told Lincoln that if all the men found guilty of murder or rape were not executed, his constituents would “dispose of them in their own way.” A Minnesota newspaper similarly counseled against leniency: “If the Government wants wholesale hanging by the acre; if it wants the Western plains turned into a wide Golgotha of dead Indians; if it wants them hunted down like wild beasts from the face of the continent, it had better refuse to perform the act of justice which the people of this State demand.”

Minnesota’s congressional delegation and Governor Alexander Ramsey joined the chorus demanding that all 303 convicted Dakotas be hanged. One missionary to the Dakota advised Lincoln “to execute the great majority of those who have been condemned” lest “the innocent as well as the guilty” be killed by vengeful settlers.

As the president and two government lawyers pored over the military court records, they discovered that some trials had lasted only fifteen minutes, that hearsay evidence had been admitted, that due process had been ignored, and that counsel had not been provided the defendants. The attorneys recommended that many of the condemned men be pardoned. While considering what to do, the president received letters from Minnesotans insisting that no mercy be shown to the “lurking savages.”

The situation resembled the one Lincoln had faced thirty years earlier during the Black Hawk War in Illinois, when his fellow militiamen wished to kill an Indian who entered their camp bearing a safe-conduct pass; then Lincoln had courageously blocked them and saved the Indian’s life.

After carefully reviewing the army trial records, the president authorized the execution of the thirty-seven Dakotas found guilty of murder and the two convicted of rape, thus sparing the lives of 264 condemned men.

Lincoln explained his reasoning to the U.S. Senate: “Anxious to not act with so much clemency as to encourage another outbreak on one hand, nor with so much severity as to be real cruelty on the other, I ordered a careful examination of the records of the trials to be made, in view of first ordering the execution of such as had been proved guilty of violating females.” In dealing with the murder charges, he had sought to discriminate between those involved in massacres and those participating only in battles.

As execution day for the condemned men drew near, Lincoln instructed the authorities to be careful not to hang Chas-kay-don, whose name was similar to one of the condemned men. At the last minute, the president pardoned Round Wind, who had helped some whites escape. On December 26, the men convicted of rape or murder died together on the gallows. In 1864, Governor Ramsey told Lincoln that if he had approved the execution all 303 Dakotas, he would have won more support for his reelection bid. “I could not afford to hang men for votes,” the president replied.

Professor Burlingame holds the Chancellor Naomi B. Lynn Distinguished Chair in Lincoln Studies at the University of Illinois, Springfield.

It is uncontested and indisputable that President Lincoln signed the execution death warrants for 39 Native Americans, as required by law of the President. However, it is also uncontested and indisputable that President Lincoln commuted the death sentences of 265 of the 303 Dakota men condemned as a result of the careful review of the facts of each Native American’s case. He also later pardoned one of the 39 mentioned in the letter to the Senate after evidence came to his attention questioning the man’s guilt.

Heather Knight wrote in opinion piece titled Effort to rename S.F. schools could have been history lesson, but it placed politics over learning –January 12, 2021:

“The panel didn’t seek the guidance of historians, instead doing its own research in a cursory fashion using mostly Wikipedia entries and Google search results . . . .”

“Families for San Francisco, an advocacy group, watched recordings of the panel’s Zoom meetings from the past year and published a report outlining major concerns. The original resolution called for engaging San Francisco in a “sustained discussion” about renaming schools, but that hasn’t happened. Instead, the panel took the decision-making entirely upon itself.”

“A group of families from Feinstein last week wrote a lengthy letter to the panel, the superintendent, school board members and others explaining why they want to keep their name. They pointed out she was a trailblazer for women’s rights, authored 500 pieces of legislation and wrote the only assault weapons ban ever passed in the United States.”


At this point, it would seem to be both wise and efficacious to hire one, two, or three professional American History historians to review the work and conclusions of the San Francisco School Board’s own-appointed “blue ribbon” schools renaming panel (working for free, apparently). It’s always better “to be penny wise than pound foolish,” as the British would say. Quentin Kopp informed the public in the November, 2020 edition of the Richmond Review: “The estimated [schools] renaming cost is $10 million.”

I had sent the following "High Importance" email to Professor Burlingame on Saturday, January 23, 2021:

Professor Burlingame,

I just learned this morning that the elected members of the San Francisco Board of Education plan to meet this coming Tuesday, January 26, 2021, to approve the selection of schools to be renamed for just and equitable causes by the School Board’s hand-selected “blue ribbon” panel of dilettante historians.

Board of Education Regular Meeting - Tuesday, January 26, 2021 at 3 pm

The Board of Education will consider Resolution No. 211-12A1 to approve the committee's recommended list of schools for renaming. Information to access this meeting is available at the Board of Education website.

Action must be taken now or it will be too late to influence the outcome of a fait accompli. I would suggest an abbreviated summation of your work on the subject of the 1862 Dakota Sioux Indian uprising and the subsequent actions taken by President Lincoln, titled “Magnanimity: Dealing With the Minnesota Sioux Uprising.” (“Abraham Lincoln: A Life,” Vol. Two, pages 480-484.) Of course, if you have something different in mind, that would be fine.

Professor Burlingame had explained to me in an email dated Tuesday, January 19, just how busy he was at the time when I had made my initial request to him on the subject, but he agreed to help:

"I'm a bit preoccupied with reading proofs and lining up images for my book on the Lincolns' marriage, due out in July from Pegasus Books; with beginning to teach my courses online for the first time ever; with nailing down arrangements for the High Holy Day in Springfield (virtual); and with readying the manuscript of "Emphatically the Black Man's President" Abraham Lincoln, Racial Egalitarian" due out from Pegasus in October.


RE: Abraham Lincoln statues - David Lockmiller - 01-27-2021 11:37 AM

Last night, the San Francisco Board of Education (5 Members), the Superintendent of San Francisco Schools, and one other school personnel voted in favor in one vote for all 44 schools to be renamed in accordance with the consensus recommendations made by the School Board's own hand-picked Panel of dilettante historians. The vote was 6 - 1.

I had prepared my comments in advance based upon the email that I had sent to all seven of the Resolution Voters on Monday, January 25, 2021 at 9:43 AM. One of the School Board Commissioners gratuitously stated before the vote that she read the emails from the Public. Obviously, she did not read my email sent to her the morning of the previous day.

I watched and listened closely to the proceedings from 3 PM to 10 PM; I did not want to miss my only opportunity to make Public comment in case there was a change in the scheduled items to be discussed.

The President of the School Board declared the protocol for public comment. Public Comments in favor of the Board Resolution authorizing renaming of 44 San Francisco schools for just cause were permitted for 30 minutes (1 minute for each comment) followed by 30 minutes for Public Comments against the measure (1 minute for each comment).

I spoke at approximately 9 PM. I read from my lengthy comment prepared in advance. I was hoping for at least two minutes to read from my prepared comments. I believe that I got an early whistle ending my Public Comment presentation. I made it to only the end of the second full paragraph of my prepared Comment before I was cut-off and silenced (but I will have to wait until the Zoom meeting of last night is posted online to confirm this perception).

Of course, the actual voters on the Board resolution were given as much time as they wanted to make their comments on the Resolution to rename 44 San Francisco schools for just causes.

One of the Board Members attacked some of President Abraham Lincoln's actions during the Civil War. He noted that Lincoln had freed only the slaves actually in Confederate territory with his Emancipation Proclamation; thus, implying President Lincoln should have freed all the slaves in the nation with his proclamation. But the Board Commissioner made no mention of the fact that President Lincoln had exercised the War powers provision of the Constitution as an incentive for the Confederate states to return to the Union by the January 1, 1863 deadline. And, as a compelling practical matter, all of the Union soldiers from Border slave states, who had joined the U. S. Army in order to save the Union, might well have laid down their weapons and the Civil War would have been lost by the forces of the Union. No mention was made of this historical fact by the allegedly historically-knowledgeable Board Member.

This same School Board member also made the claim that he grew up in Maryland and knew some of the Civil War history specific to that state. He then made the false claim in the Public Zoom meeting last night that President Lincoln had shut down the Maryland legislature.

This was not a true statement. See my post #4 made on August 21, 2020 on the thread titled "RE: Maryland constitutional questions after Fort Sumter":

Team of Rivals, page 354:

For days, the rioting in Baltimore continued. Fears multiplied that the Maryland legislature, which had convened in Annapolis, was intending to vote for secession. The cabinet debated whether the president should bring in the army "to arrest , or disperse the members of that body." Lincoln decided that "it would not be justifiable." It was a wise determination, for in the end, though secessionist mobs continued to disrupt the peace of Maryland for weeks, the state never joined the Confederacy, and eventually became, as Lincoln predicted, "the first of the redeemed."

But who is going to know that the detailed historical statement by an elected member of the San Francisco School Board is either a misstatement of history or a purposeful lie? And, so, the statement is accepted as the truth by the voters on the the School Board Resolution authorizing the renaming of Abraham Lincoln High School in San Francisco.

Does this same School Board Member mention the role of President Abraham Lincoln in the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment legislation - the "king's cure" to end slavery in the United States? The answer is "No." I believe someone recently made a popular movie about this historical accomplishment by President Abraham Lincoln in 1865. (So, it should be fairly common knowledge, even among members of the San Francisco School Board, who then should have considered this historical fact in consideration of their individual vote on the Resolution to rename San Francisco schools, including Abraham Lincoln High School.)

The School Board Member's whole Public statement seemed to me to be a well-rehearsed stage play with the specific goal in mind to discredit falsely the character and reputation of President Abraham Lincoln for an unstated, but understood, purpose.


RE: Abraham Lincoln statues - Gene C - 01-30-2021 07:39 AM

David, I hope you find some encouragement in this Fox News article and I am glad there are people like you who speak out.

Thousands oppose San Francisco's move to rename schools as petition picks up steam

https://www.foxnews.com/us/petition-san-francisco-school-name-changes

"The petition has garnered more than 10,000 signatures as of Friday after the San Francisco Board of Education voted Tuesday to change the namesakes of 44 public schools ranging from former Presidents Abraham Lincoln and George Washington to current California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein."


RE: Abraham Lincoln statues - RJNorton - 01-30-2021 09:11 AM

https://dailycaller.com/2021/01/29/san-fransisco-board-historical-errors/


RE: Abraham Lincoln statues - David Lockmiller - 01-30-2021 10:09 AM

Thank you, Gene and Roger.

The following information is from Roger's post.

The City of Boston removed a Lincoln statue on Dec. 29 following complaints that it “perpetuat[ed] harmful prejudices and obscur[ed] the role of Black Americans in shaping the nation’s fight for freedom.”

More people should have seen the "Lincoln" movie about President Lincoln's role in the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment to the U. S. Constitution, the "king's cure" to the end of slavery in the United States.


RE: Abraham Lincoln statues - RJNorton - 02-03-2021 09:50 AM

https://www.ktvb.com/article/news/local/208/after-boise-statue-defaced-abraham-lincoln-experts-discuss-his-legacy/277-b7eb0da6-af54-460f-96e8-8fe73dfe732a


RE: Abraham Lincoln statues - David Lockmiller - 02-03-2021 08:27 PM

(02-03-2021 09:50 AM)RJNorton Wrote:  https://www.ktvb.com/article/news/local/208/after-boise-statue-defaced-abraham-lincoln-experts-discuss-his-legacy/277-b7eb0da6-af54-460f-96e8-8fe73dfe732a

"His administration . . . coincided with the Dakota War of 1862. The latter event, which occurred in Minnesota, resulted in Lincoln's upholding the execution of 38 Dakota (Sioux) warriors, as well as pardoning more than 300 others charged with war crimes.”

Counter argument by Professor Michael Burlingame:

"In the summer of 1862, Dakota Indians in Minnesota . . . attacked white men, women, and children along the frontier, killing hundreds and driving over 30,000 from their homes. It was the bloodiest massacre of civilians on U.S. soil prior to September 11, 2001."

At the 5:07 mark of the video, the news commentator states: "They had nothing to do with feces left at the Abe Lincoln statue."

Start a fire and it gets a little out of control and you're not responsible.

Maybe people should not start a fire unless they know what they are talking about.


RE: Abraham Lincoln statues - David Lockmiller - 02-04-2021 08:54 AM

(02-03-2021 08:27 PM)David Lockmiller Wrote:  [quote='RJNorton' pid='82845' dateline='1612363845']
https://www.ktvb.com/article/news/local/208/after-boise-statue-defaced-abraham-lincoln-experts-discuss-his-legacy/277-b7eb0da6-af54-460f-96e8-8fe73dfe732a



From: David Lockmiller
Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2021 5:21 AM
To: 208@ktvb.com [correct email address is the208@ktvb.com]
Subject: Abraham Lincoln statue at Julia Davis Park in Boise was covered with red chalk paint accompanied by [****]

To: Whom It May Concern at KTVB(7) in Boise, ID

I have a suggestion for a news story. Ask the people that you interviewed for the referenced story to read the following.


At the 5:07 mark of the referenced story video, the news commentator states “they [a group supporting the “Dakota 38” protest] had nothing to do with feces left at the Abe Lincoln statue."

Start a fire and it gets a little out of control and you're not responsible.

People should not start a fire unless they know what they are talking about, I would suggest.


I wrote the following email to every member of the San Francisco Board of Education on the morning BEFORE the 6 – 1 vote the following evening authorizing the Resolution to rename Abraham Lincoln High School for just cause.

The Subject Line of my email to the San Francisco Board of Education reads: Related subjects of the “Dakota 38” and the recommended renaming of Abraham Lincoln High School.

Professor Michael Burlingame was the winner of the 2010 Lincoln Prize for his two-volume work on Lincoln, titled “Abraham Lincoln: A Life.” Professor Burlingame devoted five pages of his scholarly work to the 1862 Dakota Sioux Indian uprising and the subsequent actions taken by President Lincoln, titled “Magnanimity: Dealing the Minnesota Sioux Uprising.” (“Abraham Lincoln: A Life,” Vol. Two, pages 480-84.)

At my urgent request, Professor Burlingame provided to me on Sunday, January 24, 2021 an abbreviated version of this same work to present for review by the elected members of the San Francisco School Board and others. Professor Burlingame graciously wrote at the top of his email to me: “I hope this fills the bill. Please forward it to the relevant parties.”


Abraham Lincoln Overrules Death Sentence for
264 Dakota Indians Convicted of Murder or Rape
by Michael Burlingame

In the summer of 1862, Dakota Indians in Minnesota, understandably angry at white encroachment on their territory, at the government’s failure to deliver promised supplies and money, and at the notorious corruption of Indian agents and traders, attacked white men, women, and children along the frontier, killing hundreds and driving over 30,000 from their homes. It was the bloodiest massacre of civilians on U.S. soil prior to September 11, 2001.

After U.S. Army forces under General John Pope put down the rebellion, a military court condemned 303 Dakotas to death. Faced with a potential mass execution, Abraham Lincoln “resolved that such an outrage, as the indiscriminate hanging of these Indians most certainly would be, shall not take place,” according to a Washington newspaper widely regarded as an administration organ. When the president ordered the suspension of the sentences and demanded to see “the full and complete record of these convictions,” General Pope reported that white Minnesotans “are exasperated to the last degree.” The “most horrible massacres have been committed; children nailed alive to trees, women violated and then disemboweled – everything that horrible ingenuity could devise.” Therefore, the general warned, “if the guilty are not all executed I think it nearly impossible to prevent the indiscriminate massacre of all the Indians – old men, women, and children.”

Echoing that advice, Minnesota congressman Cyrus Aldrich told Lincoln that if all the men found guilty of murder or rape were not executed, his constituents would “dispose of them in their own way.” A Minnesota newspaper similarly counseled against leniency: “If the Government wants wholesale hanging by the acre; if it wants the Western plains turned into a wide Golgotha of dead Indians; if it wants them hunted down like wild beasts from the face of the continent, it had better refuse to perform the act of justice which the people of this State demand.”

Minnesota’s congressional delegation and Governor Alexander Ramsey joined the chorus demanding that all 303 convicted Dakotas be hanged. One missionary to the Dakota advised Lincoln “to execute the great majority of those who have been condemned” lest “the innocent as well as the guilty” be killed by vengeful settlers.

As the president and two government lawyers pored over the military court records, they discovered that some trials had lasted only fifteen minutes, that hearsay evidence had been admitted, that due process had been ignored, and that counsel had not been provided the defendants. The attorneys recommended that many of the condemned men be pardoned. While considering what to do, the president received letters from Minnesotans insisting that no mercy be shown to the “lurking savages.”

The situation resembled the one Lincoln had faced thirty years earlier during the Black Hawk War in Illinois, when his fellow militiamen wished to kill an Indian who entered their camp bearing a safe-conduct pass; then Lincoln had courageously blocked them and saved the Indian’s life.

After carefully reviewing the army trial records, the president authorized the execution of the thirty-seven Dakotas found guilty of murder and the two convicted of rape, thus sparing the lives of 264 condemned men.

Lincoln explained his reasoning to the U.S. Senate: “Anxious to not act with so much clemency as to encourage another outbreak on one hand, nor with so much severity as to be real cruelty on the other, I ordered a careful examination of the records of the trials to be made, in view of first ordering the execution of such as had been proved guilty of violating females.” In dealing with the murder charges, he had sought to discriminate between those involved in massacres and those participating only in battles.

As execution day for the condemned men drew near, Lincoln instructed the authorities to be careful not to hang Chas-kay-don, whose name was similar to one of the condemned men. At the last minute, the president pardoned Round Wind, who had helped some whites escape. On December 26, the men convicted of rape or murder died together on the gallows. In 1864, Governor Ramsey told Lincoln that if he had approved the execution all 303 Dakotas, he would have won more support for his reelection bid. “I could not afford to hang men for votes,” the president replied.

Professor Burlingame holds the Chancellor Naomi B. Lynn Distinguished Chair in Lincoln Studies at the University of Illinois, Springfield.

Immediately thereafter in the email, I stated to each and every member of the elected San Francisco Board of Education: “It is uncontested and indisputable that President Lincoln signed the execution death warrants for 39 Native Americans, as required by law of the President. However, it is also uncontested and indisputable that President Lincoln commuted the death sentences of 265 of the 303 Dakota men condemned as a result of the careful review of the facts of each Native American’s case.”

My email, even if read, had no impact whatsoever on the individual voting decisions of the San Francisco Board of Education (6 – 1) to authorize the renaming of Abraham Lincoln High School in San Francisco for just cause.

The people that you interviewed for your own story in Boise, Idaho regarding President Abraham Lincoln and his role in the execution of the “Dakota 38” appear to have their own hidden agenda. Why don’t you ask them if these words written by a prominent President Abraham Lincoln scholar on the subject of the “Dakota 38” have any profound effect upon their previous opinion on the subject of President Abraham Lincoln?

Yours truly,
David Lockmiller


RE: Abraham Lincoln statues - David Lockmiller - 02-04-2021 05:36 PM

School Board Meeting on the Resolution for Renaming of San Francisco Schools held on January 26, 2021.

The principal direct attack upon President Lincoln regarding the "Dakota 38," in the School Board Meeting on the Resolution for Renaming of San Francisco Schools, came from one of the members of the "blue ribbon" School Names Advisory Committee, Mary Travis, a native American. In her time from 6:14:01 to 6:18:10, at the 6:15:30 mark, she states: "Lincoln, historically, in the text books, people have talked about what a great guy he was; he emancipated slavery and stuff. He also hung over 300 Lakota people for standing up for being persecuted, then living in poverty and starvation. For somebody to say "he did one thing in his lifelong career, that doesn't make him a bad person," well, that one thing was a pretty horrendous act, the largest mass hanging in the history of this country. . . . She went on to ask: "How many history books tell the true history about the mass hanging and what it represented?"

[Note: I informed each and every member of the San Francisco School Board of Professor Michael Burlingame's book (for which he won the prestigious Lincoln Prize in 2010) of the extensive discussion of the "Dakota 38" subject matter within this same book in my email to them before 10 AM of the day BEFORE the School Board's Zoom Meeting and their subsequent 6 - 1 vote to rename Abraham Lincoln High School for just cause.]

Not one of the elected San Francisco Board of Education members raised their hand in the ZOOM meeting to correct unequivocally the statement made by Mary Travis that President Lincoln had signed the execution order of "over 300 Lakota people." Jeremiah Jeffries, the chairman of School Names Advisory Committee, who spoke almost immediately after Mary Travis had spoken, also did not correct this important gross numerical misstatement of factual history by Mary Travis that President Abraham Lincoln had ordered the execution of "over 300 Lakota people."

The members of the San Francisco School Board are supposed to be paying attention in these Public Zoom Meetings. At this time, it can only be presumed that the individual members were actually aware at the time of their vote that only the "Dakota 38" had been ordered to be executed by President Lincoln in his role as this democracy's "final appeal" officer of federal execution orders.

But, it is indisputable that their 6 - 1 vote to rename Abraham Lincoln High School for just cause dishonors President Lincoln's character and reputation in American history.

The unequivocal and indisputable facts of history are that President Lincoln signed execution orders of the "Dakota 38," but only after ordering the review of all trial records of all 303 Native Americans convicted and sentenced to death after military trials. In short, President Lincoln overruled for just reasons the death sentences for 265 Dakota Indians who had been convicted of murder or rape. Therefore, President Lincoln spared the lives of 265 Native Americans, who but for his just and fair actions as President, would have been executed.

San Francisco Board of Education Commissioner Matt Alexander made his comments to the Full Board and the Public at 6:26:42 to 6:30:05 on the video. He states at 6:27:30 -- "I grew up learning about Abraham Lincoln as an idol. . . . As I grew up I learned my education as a young person was actually flawed. I didn't know everything there was to know about Lincoln. I didn't learn about the "Dakota 38" until much later."

San Francisco Board of Education Commissioner Allison M. Collins made her comments to the Full Board and the Public at 6:30:21 to 6:32:08 on the video. She began by saying "My birthday's is on Lincoln's birthday. . . . As a black person and as a black student, I did not grow up with a positive impression because as a black person you learn the history of American presidents, and especially founding fathers, in a very different way. [I hear the false "1619 Project" propaganda rhetoric being repeated by a San Francisco Board of Education Commissioner.] She continued: "His [Lincoln's] history with Native Americans was also something that I did not learn about until recently." [Presumably, Lincoln's "history with Native Americans" is a reference made by her to the "Dakota 38."]

In the past, my bother-in-law would at times refer to some people as being "dumber than a box of rocks." I consider the members of the San Francisco School Names Advisory Committee and the San Francisco Board of Education to be "dumber than two boxes of rocks."

There is to be a "final" vote on their ill-considered resolution to rename 44 San Francisco school for just and equitable causes, including Abraham Lincoln High School. I hope that the members of the San Francisco School Board get "educated" on President Abraham Lincoln pretty soon.


RE: Abraham Lincoln statues - RJNorton - 02-05-2021 04:52 AM

(02-04-2021 05:36 PM)David Lockmiller Wrote:  ..."Mary Travis, a native American. In her time from 6:14:01 to 6:18:10, at the 6:15:30 mark, she states: "Lincoln, historically, in the text books, people have talked about what a great guy he was; he emancipated slavery and stuff. He also hung over 300 Lakota people for standing up for being persecuted, then living in poverty and starvation."

Not one of the elected San Francisco Board of Education members raised their hand in the ZOOM meeting to correct unequivocally the statement made by Mary Travis that President Lincoln had signed the execution order of "over 300 Lakota people."

This is incredibly sad and unbelievable, David.


RE: Abraham Lincoln statues - David Lockmiller - 02-05-2021 08:38 AM

(02-05-2021 04:52 AM)RJNorton Wrote:  
(02-04-2021 05:36 PM)David Lockmiller Wrote:  ..."Mary Travis, a native American. In her time from 6:14:01 to 6:18:10, at the 6:15:30 mark, she states: "Lincoln, historically, in the text books, people have talked about what a great guy he was; he emancipated slavery and stuff. He also hung over 300 Lakota people for standing up for being persecuted, then living in poverty and starvation."

Not one of the elected San Francisco Board of Education members raised their hand in the ZOOM meeting to correct unequivocally the statement made by Mary Travis that President Lincoln had signed the execution order of "over 300 Lakota people."

This is incredibly sad and unbelievable, David.

The most unbelievable part for me, Roger:

[Note: I informed each and every member of the San Francisco School Board of Professor Michael Burlingame's book (for which he won the prestigious Lincoln Prize in 2010) of the extensive discussion of the "Dakota 38" subject matter within this same book in my email to them before 10 AM of the day BEFORE the School Board's Zoom Meeting and their subsequent 6 - 1 vote to rename Abraham Lincoln High School for just cause.]


RE: Abraham Lincoln statues - David Lockmiller - 02-08-2021 10:47 AM

It’s Liberals vs. Liberals in San Francisco After Schools Erase Contested Names

New York Times By Thomas Fuller
Jan. 28, 2021

Incredulous parents and the mayor criticized the school board’s decision to change the names of 44 schools that honor historical figures like Jefferson, Lincoln and Paul Revere.

On the list were schools named after George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Francis Scott Key, for their ownership of slaves; Abraham Lincoln, for the 1862 execution of 38 Dakota tribesmen; and Dianne Feinstein, California’s senior senator, because a stolen Confederate flag outside City Hall was replaced in 1984, when she was mayor of San Francisco.

Even more scathing was the San Francisco Chronicle editorial board, which wrote that members of the Board of Education had “largely quit the education business and rebranded themselves as amateur historians.”

Dr. Adam Davis, a pediatrician in San Francisco who has a son in kindergarten and a daughter in second grade, said he was receiving text messages from friends in Boston ridiculing the changes.

“I don’t know anybody personally who doesn’t think it’s embarrassing,” Dr. Davis said. The renaming, he said, “is a caricature of what people think liberals in San Francisco do.”

On Facebook and Twitter, parents said they were worried about the cost of the renaming — estimates for changing signage, paperwork and websites for the 44 schools run into the millions — and how it will worsen the district’s already strained finances. The name changes were done without community input and took priority over reopening schools, parents said.


RE: Abraham Lincoln statues - Mylye2222 - 02-08-2021 10:58 AM

(02-08-2021 10:47 AM)David Lockmiller Wrote:  It’s Liberals vs. Liberals in San Francisco After Schools Erase Contested Names

New York Times By Thomas Fuller
Jan. 28, 2021

Incredulous parents and the mayor criticized the school board’s decision to change the names of 44 schools that honor historical figures like Jefferson, Lincoln and Paul Revere.

On the list were schools named after George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Francis Scott Key, for their ownership of slaves; Abraham Lincoln, for the 1862 execution of 38 Dakota tribesmen; and Dianne Feinstein, California’s senior senator, because a stolen Confederate flag outside City Hall was replaced in 1984, when she was mayor of San Francisco.

Dr. Adam Davis, a pediatrician in San Francisco who has a son in kindergarten and a daughter in second grade, said he was receiving text messages from friends in Boston ridiculing the changes.

“I don’t know anybody personally who doesn’t think it’s embarrassing,” Dr. Davis said. The renaming, he said, “is a caricature of what people think liberals in San Francisco do.”

On Facebook and Twitter, parents said they were worried about the cost of the renaming — estimates for changing signage, paperwork and websites for the 44 schools run into the millions — and how it will worsen the district’s already strained finances. The name changes were done without community input and took priority over reopening schools, parents said.

Due to Covid restrictions, thousands of youth in SF are in want of education, and their future is gloomy with the economic crisis. But for the PCers at the Boards Of Education, the real emergency is to engage in Neo Stalinien political trials.... Towards people who died long ago.....