Lincoln Discussion Symposium
A Sandburg Stumper - Printable Version

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A Sandburg Stumper - Rob Wick - 09-06-2012 09:11 AM

While everyone is trying to figure out the latest in Tough Tarbell Trivia, here's one about Sandburg.

When was the first time Sandburg wrote about Lincoln for a mass audience and what was the subject?

For a bonus, what was the first time he EVER wrote about Lincoln?

Prize will be an autographed first edition of Long on a Chase, if and when it's ever published.

Best
Rob


RE: A Sandburg Stumper - Joe Di Cola - 09-06-2012 09:50 AM

(09-06-2012 09:11 AM)Rob Wick Wrote:  While everyone is trying to figure out the latest in Tough Tarbell Trivia, here's one about Sandburg.

When was the first time Sandburg wrote about Lincoln for a mass audience and what was the subject?

For a bonus, what was the first time he EVER wrote about Lincoln?

Prize will be an autographed first edition of Long on a Chase, if and when it's ever published.

Best
Rob

Rob,

Is there one answer to both questions? When the Lincoln cent was issued in 1909, Carl Sandburg wrote a short piece abot Lincoln's face in the Milwaukee newspaper.


RE: A Sandburg Stumper - Rob Wick - 09-06-2012 09:52 AM

Joe,

There is no single answer for both questions. You got the first one correct, so you'll at least get the dust cover. Smile

Best
Rob

A hint on the second part.

He wrote it under the name Charles Sandburg.

Best
Rob


RE: A Sandburg Stumper - Joe Di Cola - 09-06-2012 10:08 AM

(09-06-2012 09:52 AM)Rob Wick Wrote:  Joe,

There is no single answer for both questions. You got the first one correct, so you'll at least get the dust cover. Smile

Best
Rob

A hint on the second part.

He wrote it under the name Charles Sandburg.
In Reckless Ecstacy (1904) he mentions Lincoln in "Wayside Words with Comrades." I started with that work and read through all of the items until I finally found Lincoln mentioned. I would love to have an autographed copy when available and, if this answer is still not the one, then when the book comes out I will send you a copy for you to autograph. Rob, you really make this symposium a f un place and one that stimulates the gray cells!

Best
Rob



RE: A Sandburg Stumper - Rob Wick - 09-06-2012 10:22 AM

Joe,

You've got the whole book! It was in 1904 in In Reckless Ecstasy that Sandburg first mentioned Lincoln in print. Here are a couple of paragraphs from the first draft of my introduction:

Carl Sandburg first mentioned Abraham Lincoln in print in a small, obscure yet powerful book of poetry printed in the dank basement of a Lombard College professor who befriended the “Swedish bard” soon after Sandburg’s return to Galesburg, Illinois in 1899 from the Spanish-American War. In Reckless Ecstasy was a combination of poetry and prose, and Sandburg used Lincoln almost as a glancing literary blow on the subject of humor.

“Jollying is a fine art,” Sandburg wrote. “Those who have attained the genius of it are the only true royalty of the universe.” Good fooling, as Sandburg termed it, was the glue which held many a man bonded to the populace which they strove to lead and, Sandburg said, history showed that there was no one “more sublime and touching…than Abraham Lincoln.” Mentioned only once, then quickly abandoned, Sandburg used Lincoln more as a prop instead of as serious subject matter. “My prayer is that I may be a good fool,” Sandburg added.


Good job, Joe.

Best
Rob


RE: A Sandburg Stumper - LincolnMan - 09-06-2012 03:12 PM

Great Sandburg quote. Thanks, Rob.


RE: A Sandburg Stumper - Rob Wick - 09-14-2012 08:24 AM

Carl Sandburg is only one of two private citizens to speak before a joint session of Congress. Who is the other one, when did he speak and what was his topic?

A couple of points:

1. I am talking here joint sessions, not joint meetings, which is a less formal gathering.
2. To be correct, all three parts of the question must be answered.

Best
Rob


RE: A Sandburg Stumper - Rob Wick - 09-14-2012 02:29 PM

Clue# 1

At various times, he did serve in the United States government.

Best
Rob


RE: A Sandburg Stumper - Rob Wick - 09-14-2012 04:46 PM

Clue #2

At one time he served as Secretary of the Navy.

Best
Rob


RE: A Sandburg Stumper - Rob Wick - 09-14-2012 08:22 PM

Final clue for the night.

He played a role in the formation of the Naval Academy in Annapolis.

Best
Rob


RE: A Sandburg Stumper - LincolnMan - 09-14-2012 09:19 PM

I think I know this! It was a gentleman who has been awarded a Carl Sandburg Award (I don't remember exactly the name of the honor). It was David McCullough in 1989 speaking on the occasion of the Bicentennial of Congress or was it the Constitution? I remember he talked about the digital clock in comparison to old-type clocks. Well, that's what I remember anyway!


RE: A Sandburg Stumper - Rob Wick - 09-14-2012 09:24 PM

Sorry, Bill, but it isn't McCullough. He spoke before a joint meeting, not a joint session. Plus, he was never Secretary of the Navy.

Best
Rob


RE: A Sandburg Stumper - RJNorton - 09-15-2012 03:51 AM

Gideon Welles?


RE: A Sandburg Stumper - Gene C - 09-15-2012 05:24 AM

George Bancroft?


RE: A Sandburg Stumper - Joe Di Cola - 09-15-2012 08:17 AM

Since Sandburg has been credited with being the first private citizen to address a joint session, I was thinbking it was at least a contemporary of Sandburg but your last clue has the person being instrumental in the establishment of the Naval Academy. Hmmmmm, I am stumped!