Lincoln Discussion Symposium
Where Is It? - Printable Version

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RE: Where Is It? - AussieMick - 10-30-2019 02:44 PM

I'll guess an attempt to make $$$ with an auction in Springfield.


RE: Where Is It? - Rob Wick - 10-30-2019 03:13 PM

Right city, Mike, but not an auction.

Best
Rob


RE: Where Is It? - L Verge - 10-30-2019 03:44 PM

Oldroyd's display while living in the Lincolns' Springfield home?


RE: Where Is It? - Rob Wick - 10-30-2019 03:51 PM

Laurie is correct. This was the result of Osborne Oldroyd's living in Lincoln's house in Springfield. Shortly after this photo was taken Oldroyd was thrown out and he moved to the Petersen House in DC.

Best
Robn


RE: Where Is It? - RJNorton - 10-31-2019 04:07 AM

Where was this photo taken?

[Image: whereisit.jpg]



RE: Where Is It? - Eva Elisabeth - 10-31-2019 07:52 AM

The Edward's? The plant is interesting, I don't remember seeing many plants in 19th century parlors.


RE: Where Is It? - RJNorton - 10-31-2019 07:56 AM

Excellent, Eva! Kudos. Yes, it is the Edwards' parlor where the Lincolns were married on November 4, 1842.


RE: Where Is It? - L Verge - 10-31-2019 10:38 AM

(10-31-2019 07:52 AM)Eva Elisabeth Wrote:  The Edward's? The plant is interesting, I don't remember seeing many plants in 19th century parlors.

I agree with Eva about the plants. Any date on the photo? If I remember correctly, indoor plants did not become popular until the late-Victorian era. Before that, many folks thought that the plants were unhealthy, stealing air from the room. Of course, you have some of the rich wigs that had orangery rooms in their mansions back in the Federal era.


RE: Where Is It? - RJNorton - 10-31-2019 10:57 AM

Here is a photo that is a little clearer. I do not recall seeing a date for this photo, but I shall look.

[Image: edwpar.jpg]



RE: Where Is It? - Eva Elisabeth - 10-31-2019 11:01 AM

Could the lamp hanging for the ceiling be an electric one? Doesn't look like gas or candlelight to me.
As for the plants being unhealthy is certainly right in some way, soil containing lots of bacteria and possibly mold and mold spores, which is why plant aren't allowed in hospitals. My thinking however was that people back then found plants as animals rather something essentially functional, nothing to "pet" or tend to or care for for mere pleasure the same way we use to today.


RE: Where Is It? - RJNorton - 10-31-2019 02:30 PM

(10-31-2019 11:01 AM)Eva Elisabeth Wrote:  Could the lamp hanging for the ceiling be an electric one?

It's possible as the home was not torn down until 1917.


RE: Where Is It? - L Verge - 10-31-2019 06:57 PM

(10-31-2019 02:30 PM)RJNorton Wrote:  
(10-31-2019 11:01 AM)Eva Elisabeth Wrote:  Could the lamp hanging for the ceiling be an electric one?

It's possible as the home was not torn down until 1917.

I'm inclined to go with a gas chandelier, but it is hard to determine anything with the photo being "distant" and the color so white. The fireplace insert looks like a Franklin stove - need to find out when they became part of homes. The tufted armchair reminds me of ca. 1880-1900, but I'm guessing.


RE: Where Is It? - Eva Elisabeth - 11-01-2019 04:36 AM

Laurie, it looks to me that the lamp shades "go down" (like in the left pic, couldn't find a better one) instead of up (second pic):
[attachment=3147] [attachment=3148] [attachment=3149]
Would that (down) be possible with gas? I've only seen the "up version" with gas.


RE: Where Is It? - Dennis Urban - 11-01-2019 09:30 AM

The fixture globes look upturned to me. Many such gas chandeliers were converted to electric, running the electric wires inside the former gas tubing. Based on all that I can see, I think it's a gas chandelier circa 1900.


RE: Where Is It? - L Verge - 11-01-2019 02:58 PM

(11-01-2019 09:30 AM)Dennis Urban Wrote:  The fixture globes look upturned to me. Many such gas chandeliers were converted to electric, running the electric wires inside the former gas tubing. Based on all that I can see, I think it's a gas chandelier circa 1900.

They look upturned to me also and maybe not wide enough to hold an electrical bulb? Between family pieces from the late-1800s and flea-market finds ca. early-1900s of my late mother-in-law, I have seen gas lamps with upturned shades and down turned ones. If I remember correctly the newer pieces that were down turned had a sort of white cone over the actual gas jet.

P.S. Forget my question about the Franklin stove. I should have known that it was invented by Big Ben in the colonial days and was probably out of use after the Civil War?