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Mary Lincoln Extra Credit Questions - Printable Version

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RE: Mary Lincoln Extra Credit Questions - Eva Elisabeth - 03-28-2016 04:28 AM

You forgot to eliminate the microwave... very smart, Gene, and sewing is hot. No scissors however, but needless we're most likely part of this item (shame on me, I cannot tell from experience, but it wouldn't make sense to me without...)
So, what precisely was the gift?


RE: Mary Lincoln Extra Credit Questions - RJNorton - 03-28-2016 04:43 AM

(03-28-2016 04:28 AM)Eva Elisabeth Wrote:  very smart, Gene, and sewing is hot.

A sewing machine? (If that is correct Gene should also get credit as I am going by his guess combined with your clue).


RE: Mary Lincoln Extra Credit Questions - Eva Elisabeth - 03-28-2016 06:46 AM

Kudos, Roger, that is correct, and the both of you deserve the prize, this catchy audio sewing machine delivered by Betty Hutton:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=999ph8iRT4o

The Chicago Tribune reported this on January 24, 1861. According to Catherine Clinton, the sewing machine "became a prized possession that Mrs. Lincoln took with her when she left the White House."

I was reminded of this story when coming across this grave:
[attachment=2191] [attachment=2192]
The grave inscription reads:

"Here rests
Mr.
Joseph Madersperger
Inventor of the sewing machine
1768-1850"

Obviously many have or are claimed to have invented the sewing machine - I found Mr. Madersperger here, he was granted a patent in 1814, and even he was preceded by an Englishman:
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/the-many-many-designs-of-the-sewing-machine-2142740/

PS: I found the grave while actually searching for this gentleman's grave:
[attachment=2193]
And yes, both RIP on an old cemetery for the poor (in Vienna)!


RE: Mary Lincoln Extra Credit Questions - RJNorton - 03-28-2016 08:31 AM

(03-28-2016 06:46 AM)Eva Elisabeth Wrote:  "Here rests
Mr.
Joseph Madersperger
Inventor of the sewing machine
1768-1850"

Thanks for the prize and all this information, Eva. I still have the text I used when I was teaching. It was very "slanted" toward American inventors, and the only name mentioned in connection with the sewing machine is Elias Howe.


RE: Mary Lincoln Extra Credit Questions - Eva Elisabeth - 03-28-2016 04:05 PM

My favorite patent dispute story is that about the gyrocompass - gives me goosebumps.

When around 1900 Dr. Hermann Anschütz-Kaempfe tried to realize his plan and dream to reach the North Pole with a submarine, the navigational difficulties had to solve led him to invent the first gyro compass. In the United States however, Elmer Ambrose Sperry invented a similar gyrocompass, leading to a patent dispute in 1915. Called upon by the court, Albert Einstein provided the expert opinion in the dispute, Anschütz won. The "meeting" due to Anschütz' never-ending attempts to improve the construction developed into an intensive, fruitful cooperation - together Anschütz and Einstein improved the system and when they were granted a patent for the ball compass in 1922, Anschütz withdrew the first patent, leaving it to Sparry (and the United States Navy used it in both world wars). Despite, Anschütz and Einstein became friends, and Einstein, a passionate sailor, came over for a sailing vacation every summer for over a decade until the Nazis chimed in. Except in the US and UK, the Anschütz/Einstein compass became most successful and standard system worldwide. Anschütz however never made it to the North Pole by submarine.
[attachment=2194]
Sorry for all this off course romantic sailor's yarn - as an intro to the question - has Abraham Lincoln's shallow water boat device ever been built "life-size" (i.e. not as a model), and tested?


RE: Mary Lincoln Extra Credit Questions - L Verge - 03-28-2016 06:57 PM

According to Abraham Lincoln Online: With some relief Herndon said, "the invention was never applied to any vessel, so far as I ever learned, and the threatened revolution in steamboat architecture and navigation never came to pass."


RE: Mary Lincoln Extra Credit Questions - Eva Elisabeth - 03-29-2016 04:10 AM

Thanks, Laurie - I was also wondering if such had been done in the course of bi- or other centennials or by museums in our days?


RE: Mary Lincoln Extra Credit Questions - RJNorton - 03-29-2016 04:57 AM

I do not know, Eva, but I doubt it. In Wikipedia it says, "However, it was never produced for practical use. There are doubts as to whether it would have actually worked: It "likely would not have been practical," stated Paul Johnston, curator of maritime history at the National Museum of American History, "because you need a lot of force to get the buoyant chambers even two feet down into the water. My gut feeling is that it might have been made to work, but Lincoln's considerable talents lay elsewhere."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham_Lincoln%27s_patent


RE: Mary Lincoln Extra Credit Questions - Eva Elisabeth - 03-29-2016 08:06 AM

Thanks, Roger - the last sentence is about what Herndon thought about Abraham Lincoln's 1858/59 lectures on discoveries and inventions and his plans to take up lecturing in this field again after the presidency. Do you think he would have?


RE: Mary Lincoln Extra Credit Questions - RJNorton - 03-29-2016 08:26 AM

Wow, great question, Eva. I do not know, but I doubt it. He was already quite worn down (according to many accounts although the doctors at the autopsy were impressed) by April 1865, and I think Reconstruction would have taken its toll, too. My best guess is that he would have simply retired in 1869. I just cannot picture him doing a lot of lectures. But who knows...


RE: Mary Lincoln Extra Credit Questions - Eva Elisabeth - 03-29-2016 02:50 PM

Thanks for your thoughts, Roger. While he was worn down I think he was a restless mind and no homebody either. I can't imagine he would really have retired to doing anything "brainy" - despite I think he would have traveled as he himself stated on his last day. But on his last day he also enjoyed to show the conservatory to Mrs. Hess and sister-in-law (if I remember the relation correctly). He still did have an interest in sciences I believe. Maybe he would have studied things simply for himself however.

Another of his original plans were to continue practicing with Herndon. Somehow I feel the presidency has separated the two of them too much for that.


RE: Mary Lincoln Extra Credit Questions - RJNorton - 03-29-2016 03:04 PM

(03-29-2016 02:50 PM)Eva Elisabeth Wrote:  But on his last day he also enjoyed to show the conservatory to Mrs. Hess and sister-in-law (if I remember the relation correctly).

Yes! Those two folks made the claim they are the only people to shake the hands of both Abraham Lincoln and John Wilkes Booth on the day of the assassination.


RE: Mary Lincoln Extra Credit Questions - Anita - 05-05-2016 08:38 PM

Who died here and what was his connection to Mary Lincoln ?

[attachment=2264]


RE: Mary Lincoln Extra Credit Questions - Eva Elisabeth - 05-05-2016 09:46 PM

Is that US (San Fran?) or Europe?


RE: Mary Lincoln Extra Credit Questions - Anita - 05-05-2016 09:49 PM

Eva, it's US but not San Francisco.