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Exploring Lincoln

Great Historians Reappraise Our Greatest President


Edited by Harold Holzer, Craig L. Symonds, and Frank J. Williams
304 Pages | 14 b/w illustrations | 9780823265633 | $24.95

Spring Sale Special!

$12.48


"This is a veritable feast for Lincoln devotees as astute historians probe Lincoln through many perspectives, with perhaps the most thrilling account being the sensational discovery of a cache of Mary Todd Lincoln's letters. A must-read for those who want a better understanding of the sixteenth president."--Anthony S. Pitch, author,"They Have Killed Papa Dead!" The Road to Ford's Theatre, Abraham Lincoln's Murder, and the Rage for Vengeance

"The rich variety of insights and information on Lincoln and the Civil War served up in this book makes it truly a moveable feast. Some traditional interpretations are confirmed; others are challenged and new perspectives set forth; and all are of unfailing interest. This is a volume to be kept handy on your shelf and consulted again and again."--James McPherson, Princeton University

Ubiquitous and enigmatic, the historical Lincoln, the literary Lincoln, even the cinematic Lincoln have all proved both fascinating and irresistible. Though some 16,000 books have been written about him, there is always more to say, new aspects of his life to consider, new facets of his persona to explore. Enlightening and entertaining, Exploring Lincoln offers a selection of sixteen papers presented at the Lincoln Forum symposia over the past three years.

Shining new light on particular aspects of Lincoln and his tragically abbreviated presidency, Exploring Lincoln presents a compelling snapshot of current Lincoln scholarship and a fascinating window into understanding America's greatest president.

http://fordhampress.com/index.php/expori...dium=email
There have been even more MTL letters discovered? In addition the cache that Jason Emerson wrote about in "The Madness of Mary Lincoln?"

Do I understand correctly?
Not sure this book is what you hope it is.
It seems to be a collection of 16 lectures or papers by various Lincoln scholars. Jason Emerson is one of the contributors.
Okay thanks Gene. I got my hopes up for a moment that more of MTL's letters had been discovered!Undecided
This reminds me of an interesting point and question Kim Bauer mentioned in his speech at the conference - Mary wrote so many letters, to her husband, Robert, his wife, her grand-nephew Lewis, and many others, but not any to Tad when she toured European spas while leaving him at the boarding school in Frankfurt. (Or none survived?)
I thought the exact same thing, Eva, when Kim said that. Could Tad have destroyed them? Do we know Tad's feelings about his mother - especially her leaving him while she toured? Or even his thoughts on her mothering skills? Did Tad become her crutch after awhile? The son to stabilize the mother?
If Mary's own correspondence is any indication Tad remained loving and protective right up to the end. Linda Leavitt Turner opines that his was the most tragic fate of all the Lincoln boys...compelled to act as a crutch, nurse and companion to his increasingly unstable morbid mother and never really getting a chance to enjoy his blossoming young manhood. I agree with her assessment.Sad

He never wanted to go live in Europe. He begged to stay in the U.S. with Robert and his wife and go to school in America. But Mary would not hear of it because as she wrote .."Tad has become necessary to my very existence" or something similar. So she clung to the boy after the assassination and rarely let him out of her sight.
What happened to Tad's effects? Did Mary hold on to them, or give them away?
(03-29-2015 01:44 AM)LincolnToddFan Wrote: [ -> ]If Mary's own correspondence is any indication Tad remained loving and protective right up to the end. Linda Leavitt Turner opines that his was the most tragic fate of all the Lincoln boys...compelled to act as a crutch, nurse and companion to his increasingly unstable morbid mother and never really getting a chance to enjoy his blossoming young manhood. I agree with her assessment.Sad

He never wanted to go live in Europe. He begged to stay in the U.S. with Robert and his wife and go to school in America. But Mary would not hear of it because as she wrote .."Tad has become necessary to my very existence" or something similar. So she clung to the boy after the assassination and rarely let him out of her sight.

Even though I am sympathetic to Mary Lincoln and think that I kind of understand her actions, I am happy that you and I (and Linda Leavitt Turner) think alike on her treatment of Tad. I have seen similar, modern cases in my own realm today where sons (and some daughters) are their mother's crutches for life. And, after the passing of the mother, they are grown-ups on their own in need of crutches.
Laurie, yes I agree. I have been very partisan pro-Mary on this board but let's face it-her pathological selfishness was one of her most notorious traits. Knowing why she was so neurotic about keeping Tad with her does not make me feel any less sad for his fate. One wonders what might have happened if he had not been subjected to the cold, damp climate in Germany and the ocean crossing that triggered his final illness. And he never ever complained for himself, instead telling a journalist shortly before his death that attacks on his mother made him unhappy.

Poor kid.Sad

[What happened to Tad's effects? Did Mary hold on to them, or give them away]//quote

Susan, I too would love to know how his final effects were handled even though I know it couldn't have been much. His financial inheritance was given to Mary but she turned it over to Robert because she felt he needed it more with his growing young family. It's a rare example of Mary NOT exhibiting selfishness.
Laurie and Toia, I agree on what you think about Mary's conduct. I, too, wonder if Tad would have "freed" himself later.

As for the effects, please see posts ##83-86:
http://rogerjnorton.com/LincolnDiscussio...e#pid37579

- Between Lincoln's death and the settlement of the estate, she received from Davis 4,085.51$, Tad 1,096.65$ (Robert 7,300.15$). I don't think she spent Tad's money for herself.

- Both Mary's and Tad's (and Robert's) inheritance, settled on Nov. 13, 1867, were $36,991.54.

- On July 14, 1870 C ongress voted for giving her an annual $3,000 pension, she sure spent that on both Tad's and her living costs.
Great info, thank you Eva-Smile
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