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Well, our fellow forum member, Tom Bogar, is on the book signing trail right off the bat! We just received notice of his lecture and book signing to be held at the National Archives on Wednesday, November 20, at noon. This will be in the McGowan Theater, so enter through the special programs entrance at 7th and Constitution.
I arrived home today to see my copy of Tom's book waiting for me. I know what I'll be reading this weekend.

I have to say that this may sound silly, but I'm charmed with the book after seeing the front of the dust jacket. The title, subtitle and author's name are in fonts reminiscent of 19th-century posters; but what impressed me the most was the small print of the infamous lithograph of Booth shooting from behind with Mrs. Lincoln's arms thrown up in fright and Rathbone looking towards the sound of the gun.

The print has been beautifully reproduced in soft pastel colors. I love pastels, but am so used to seeing this print in black and white or in heavy tones of black and red that this rendition just jumped off the cover at me. It's just one of those little things in life...

Flipping through the pages, I was also very happy to see how many experts in our field were acknowledged - and it brought special joy to see Roger Norton offer a small review and also be acknowledged both personally and professionally for his help and for the information that has been stored for posterity in this wonderful forum of his.

Hess1865

Got home from work and my copy was waiting for me!!
I read the first 25 pages, and then forced myself to stop-until later.
This looks like a great addition to our assassination bookshelves!!!
Laurie, thank you very much for your kind comment. Tom is the first author ever to include a review by me, and when I showed it to my wife she could not believe it either.
Tom's first title for his book used a Shakespearean phrase about "Walking in the Shadows" to describe the actors/actresses/employees behind the scenes at Ford's Theatre. Mr. Norton, I think that is an appropriate terminology to describe your efforts also.

For nearly two decades now, you have offered the public a wonderful website on Lincoln and various phases of his life and have worked with thousands of students and others interested in our subject without being fully recognized for the work that you do in this field. Now this forum has been added to your repertoire, and you are handling it in a fun, but professional, manner so that information can be given and appreciated by those of us who want to educate and be educated.

Tom knew exactly what he was doing when he added you in the line-up for comments and recognition. This is going to sound strange to some of you, but Roger and I have known each other for years, but have never met personally. I have never known him to be anything but honest, caring, and highly knowledgeable. We are all very lucky to be associated with him.
Thank you very much, Laurie! Your words are appreciated!

Back to Tom's book. Tom's book is indeed a unique addition to Lincoln assassination lore. It has information I have never seen in any other source. What a delight! Kudos, Tom!

Mr. Hess - you nailed it!
Can't wait to read this!

Thanks, ya'll. Roger, you're a natural for reviewing and or inclusion in such a book!

Laurie, how long do you think it'll take the Surratt House to get it in stock?
(10-26-2013 09:54 AM)L Verge Wrote: [ -> ]Tom's first title for his book used a Shakespearean phrase about "Walking in the Shadows" to describe the actors/actresses/employees behind the scenes at Ford's Theatre. Mr. Norton, I think that is an appropriate terminology to describe your efforts also.

For nearly two decades now, you have offered the public a wonderful website on Lincoln and various phases of his life and have worked with thousands of students and others interested in our subject without being fully recognized for the work that you do in this field. Now this forum has been added to your repertoire, and you are handling it in a fun, but professional, manner so that information can be given and appreciated by those of us who want to educate and be educated.

Tom knew exactly what he was doing when he added you in the line-up for comments and recognition. This is going to sound strange to some of you, but Roger and I have known each other for years, but have never met personally. I have never known him to be anything but honest, caring, and highly knowledgeable. We are all very lucky to be associated with him.
Allow me to add: It's great that Roger makes it even possible for foreigners and humble freaks to catch more than just a distant glimpse (of the sort a child catches when gazing all wide-eyed at the toys behind the shop window, sadly knowing there's - at the very moment - no way to reach them) of all "things Lincoln".

Before I discovered Roger's fantastic Lincoln-websites, I had tried to contact several other sites, seeking answers to Lincoln questions, but never received any reply. Roger was the only one who answered, and this in the kindest and most helpful manner I could think of. And opened the door - I was even invited to join this honorable community and to get to know wonderful people by whose knowledge I'm awestruck all the time. And it's not just that, it's all great fun, too! All this has enriched my life, and I'm sure not the only one to think so. Roger, I cannot thank you enough!

Now I'm looking forward to read another surely fascinating book I'd otherwise probably not have learned of.
Betty and Eva, thank you very much. Believe me, your words are appreciated!

Back to Tom's book. I believe this book may be the first one I've seen that gives the location of where John Mathews burned the letter John Wilkes Booth gave him during the afternoon of April 14th. I have read all sorts of places where Mathews burned the letter; included among the places are the theater itself and the Petersen House. Some books just say he burned it in his room without giving a location. Well, it turns out Mathews was living in a boardinghouse on L Street, and he burned the letter there.
Betty,

Tom's book has been on order for months, so hopefully we will receive it this coming week. Shipment is all at the whim of the publishers or their agents. I have also asked our gift shop manager to contact Tom to see if he will come down one day and sign all of the first shipment of books so that we can offer signed copies to the first buyers. He will also be speaking at the March conference and participating in the Authors' Hour with signings.

Speaking of our Lincoln assassination conference (Lincoln's Assassination: Collateral Damage), the information packets will go out in the mail to all Surratt Society members this week. Everyone is welcome at our conferences, however; so if you are not a Society member, just send us a name and mailing address, and a packet will be sent to you. It is the weekend of March 14-16, and includes off-site bus tours on Friday and Sunday.

Friday's tour will take us into D.C. to visit Clara Barton's downtown office, where she aided families and soldiers after the war; a visit to the newly restored Trial Room at the Old Arsenal (now Ft. McNair); then over to the National Portrait Gallery for a Civil War exhibit. Lunch will be at a restaurant that occupies a ca. 1875 former Masonic Lodge. The bus will return in time for our opening reception at the James O. Hall Research Center.

On Sunday, Yankees who go on the bus tour better be prepared to chase that crafty John Singleton Mosby because we're spending the day on his trail in the Shenandoah Valley.

In between those bus tours, we will spend Saturday getting educated by talks on the missing autopsy photo, people and relics of the assassination story, the actors, actresses, and theater personnel caught in the drama at Ford's Theatre, Henry Rathbone, Mrs. Lincoln, and Robert Lincoln. The banquet that evening will end with a presentation on finding clues through period photography.
Backstage at the Lincoln Assassination is a case of you-can-tell-a-book-by-its-cover.
The cover is magnificent, and the book is too.
Just four chapters in, I'm already seeing Ford's from a very different perspective.
For the first time in 150 years, Tom has told it the way it was -- to the actors.
Laurie, I would be happy to (sign books in advance). As soon as they come in, let me know, and I'll gladly come on down.

And thank you, everyone, for the wonderful, heartening posts. I hope folks can make it on the 20th to National Archives. As other appearances arise, I'll post them on my website: thomasabogar.com. And I look forward to seeing everyone again at the conference in March!
I found time to read over 100 pages this weekend, and I love it! I'm feeling like I'm sitting by myself in the orchestra seats at Ford's watching acquaintances in the cast and crew going through their routines in preparation for a night that would change everyone's lives.

I am also learning many little details that I never remember hearing about before. Again, I'm going to sound silly, but even the feel and texture of the pages are warm and inviting in an "old book" sort of way. I haven't been as comfortable with being immersed in text since Manhunt and Darkest Dawn - both of which made me feel like I was along for the ride.
Congratulations Tom, I am really looking forward to reading your book when it comes available at the Surratt House store. I hope Laurie ordered enough copies it sounds like there is a waiting list already. Laurie, are you accepting bribes? What's it going to take to set one of those copies aside for me?
I just filled out an order form for you, Mike. As soon as they come in, I will post the cost and ordering information on this forum.
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